film suggestions for low-light/night

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by notelliot, Nov 18, 2005.

  1. notelliot

    notelliot TPF Noob!

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    also, are there any filters that would have good effect in low-light?

    (for use without flash)
     
  2. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    For low light/night you want a high ISO - 400 and upwards.
    Filters? Why would you want to use filters in low light situations?
    With the exception of filters like UV/Skylight and 'starburst', filters cut down on the amount of light getting in to the camera by 1 stop or more. If you already have a situation where there is little light, why would you want to reduce it even further?
    But filters will all work just as well at night as during the day, for colour and black and white.
     
  3. westman

    westman TPF Noob!

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  4. Meysha

    Meysha still being picky Vicky

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    I personally love the look of a low ISO film with a long long exposure at night time. That way you can use a nice small aperture and get some very pretty light stars - without using one of those annoying star filters.

    Maybe you could tell us what effect you were looking for and we could point you in the right direction?
     
  5. j_mcquillen

    j_mcquillen TPF Noob!

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    I'm with Meysha on this one - a slower ISO film (say 100, or even 50) with a sturdy tripod and a longer exposure will give you a less 'grainy' image, and generally better colour saturation.

    If you're planning to shoot under street lights (the orange sort), you could try using Tungsten-balanced film (Fuji RTP II for example, ISO 64) to give more natural looking colours. If you can't get hold of any of this, a blue filter (80A or 80B for example) with regular 'daylight' film will have a similar effect.
     

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