General questions about getting back into wedding photography, some landscape (D200)

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by CR88, May 18, 2009.

  1. CR88

    CR88 TPF Noob!

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    Hello all, I am new to this forum so forgive me if I post this wrong, or in the wrong section. A wedding photographer, that I used to work with years ago, has recently approached me about working with him again. So, I am trying to work on my chops and get my equip in order. I don't have a lot of $$$, as this would just be a weekend hobby, but I found a D200 at Bust Buy for $599 that was too good to pass up. I have heard the bad points and have been overwhelmed by the D300, D90 v D200 discussions online, but I am just starting up again, I didn't have enough to go to the D300 and really like the feel of the D200 much more than the D90 so I figured it was my best bet. My goal is to eventually go with the 300's replacement when I can afford it. I was shooting a D70 before, the main guy was shooting a D2 and medium format, so I am hoping that a D200 would be sufficient for the time being. Is the D200 going to be enough for me to get good sellable results, provided that my skills are up to par? I mostly do the B&W candids and some landscape, while the main guy does all of the formal and posed stuff. For a flash I have an SB600, lenses: 50mm 1.4, and the 18-200 VR. I am looking at adding something in the range of 80-200 2.8, Tokina, Sigma or Nikon and possibly a Tamron 10-24mm? I am not happy with the 200’s low light performance at all, even at low ISO's with tripod, but I assume it's my lack of skill and hope that it will be better as I become more knowledgeable and proficient with this camera. Any info or feedback would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Double H

    Double H TPF Noob!

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    I have the Fuji S5, which is the same body as the D200, and it has been a true workhorse for me yielding great results in weddings and my fine art stuff. I would say it should be fine, especially if you already have some good glass. Get a battery grip if you can. Of course, I recently purchased a D700, and it kicks my Fuji's arse!

    It'll feel good to be back in the saddle, I'm sure. :thumbup:
     
  3. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    The lackluster high ISO capability of the D200 will make your indoor shooting life difficult.

    The CMOS sensor in the D90 is the same sensor that is in the D300, so the D90 has virtually the same high ISO performance and image quality of the D300 for 1/2 the price.

    Trouble is $600 for a new D200 is a good price. Back in November a D90 body only could be had for $775 at Buydig.com. A new grip for the D200 may be hard to come by. I know I got Cameta's second to last new MB-D200 a couple of months ago.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2009
  4. CR88

    CR88 TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the replies.
     
  5. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Welcome to the forum.

    I wouldn't get too bent out of shape about the ISO performance of the D200. Just because it isn't up to par with the latest greatest cameras, doesn't mean that it's unusable. Only a few years ago, it was practically unheard of to shoot a wedding at ISO 1600, but now people seem to think that if you can't get clean images at ISO 6400, you might as well just go home. :roll:

    Just learn the limitations of your equipment and work within them.
     

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