Help....I was playing with my camera today by a waterfall...

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Jeepnut28, Oct 15, 2006.

  1. Jeepnut28

    Jeepnut28 TPF Noob!

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    I was trying to set a long shutter speed to capture the flow of the water.....I just kept getting a totally overexposed image....

    i could not figure it out.....

    the details:

    it was a bright sunny day

    i shoot with a canon 350D and i had the 18-55 kit lens on...

    settings I tried:

    manual exposure, ISO 100 on a tripod 6 second shutter speed......aperture was set from 32 all the way down to 16......my meter kept showing way over exposed

    then I tried the TV (Time Value exposure) where I let the camera pick the aperture and I set the shutter speed....camera kept setting at 32 and blinking at over exposed.....

    any ideas or tips?
     
  2. Peanuts

    Peanuts TPF Noob!

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    For 'good' blurring of a waterful, you will probably only need 1-2 seconds of exposure. Next time, just put your shutter speed within 1-4seconds and experiment. Obviously if you want a small aperture, you will have longer exposures and such. From the sounds of it, it was simply too bright. The one other 'method' would be to use a ND filter.
     
  3. DeepSpring

    DeepSpring TPF Noob!

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    neutral density filter would allow you to use a long shutter
     
  4. toastydeath

    toastydeath TPF Noob!

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    To add to what Peanuts said, shoot just as the sun sets.
     
  5. W.Smith

    W.Smith TPF Noob!

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    A polarizer filter will cut another 2.5 stops off of that. And give you control of reflections in the water.
     
  6. ladyphotog

    ladyphotog TPF Noob!

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    You really don't need to go that long to get the mist effect of flowing water, 1/4 of a sec or less will do it and always use a polarizer when shooting it, helps with the exposure and reflections.
     
  7. Innocence

    Innocence TPF Noob!

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    are nd filters the same as polarisers?

    I've heard them both described as sunglasses for your lenses. :)
     
  8. .Steve

    .Steve TPF Noob!

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    Check out the exif info, exposure was only 1/8 of a second. Your exposure times are way too long.
    [​IMG]
     
  9. Jeepnut28

    Jeepnut28 TPF Noob!

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    Great! Thanks for the help. sounds like my shutter speed was way too long. I will try again soon.

    it was frustrating to say the least.
     
  10. darich

    darich TPF Noob!

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    I'd agree with the others wh osaid 6seconds is too long.
    Here's my attempt and the exposure was 1/3 of a second.
    [​IMG]
     
  11. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    you get funny effects with water when you go to exposures over5 seconds ... can get very dreamy ;)

    In bright sun you will need neutral density filters .. if it is not too bright a polarizer might do the job as it also reduces the light hitting the film or sensor.
     
  12. newrmdmike

    newrmdmike TPF Noob!

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    also, a time rule is kind of silly, i've seen waterfall shots with exposures up to a minute (ansel adams in fact)

    just depends on the light, there shouldn't be some rule of thumb imo
     

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