Help with buying a UV Filter

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by martins, Jun 13, 2008.

  1. martins

    martins TPF Noob!

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    I am currently looking at buying a 52mm Hoya Multi-Coated UV filter but dont really understand what the F number is. I can order F18, F24, F46, or F91. Can someone tell me what that all means?
     
  2. Socrates

    Socrates TPF Noob!

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    I never heard of that designator. Where did you see it?
     
  3. martins

    martins TPF Noob!

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  4. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I can't see eBay from work, but if someone could explain that when they do get an answer, I'd be interested to know myself.
     
  5. skieur

    skieur TPF Noob!

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    A multi-coated filter is supposed to reduce internal reflections which degrade image quality. The quick filter test by the way is to hold the filter in front of you and look at the "reflection" of a light or something bright behind you. A very weak reflection denotes a filter that will be better in reducing the internal reflections that reduce quality.

    The Hoya Pro 1 is also supposed to actually reduce the haze in the distance of a landscape shot but of course whether that is accurate or just advertising talk is rather difficult to fathom.

    skieur
     
  6. martins

    martins TPF Noob!

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    So what UV filter would be best for a beginner amateur?
     
  7. Socrates

    Socrates TPF Noob!

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    True, but none of that has anything to do with the F-numbers quoted by the OP. I went to the Hoya web site and they're not there.
     
  8. martins

    martins TPF Noob!

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    So can someone tell me what I should be looking for in a UV filter? What brands to stay away from and what brands people are using.

    What is also a skylight filter?
     
  9. Mystwalker

    Mystwalker TPF Noob!

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    For filters, I go B&H Photo (clicky on upper right).

    I search for "B&W XXmm MRC" - the "XX" being 52, "MRC" being multi coated.

    I know they also have Hoya, but I'm not familiar with how they name their filters.

    Here is result for B&W. The $29.95 looks like what you need - 52mm 010 UV Filter MRC (somethign like that). Not sure why the price is so low though. I thought all of these were in the $80-$100 range. Maybe 52mm cheaper to make?
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?ci=0&sb=ps&pn=1&sq=desc&InitialSearch=yes&O=jsp%2Fworkaround.jsp&A=search&Q=*&bhs=t&shs=B%26W+52mm+mrc&sb=ps&pn=1&sq=desc&InitialSearch=yes&O=jsp%2Fworkaround.jsp&A=search&Q=*&bhs=t&Go.x=20&Go.y=13
     
  10. Socrates

    Socrates TPF Noob!

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    Nikon, Hoya and B&W are all good brands. Within the Hoya line, there are several versions, the highest quality (and most expensive) being their "Pro-1" series (that's what I buy). I'm not familiar with B&W other than being told by others that they're a quality outfit.

    I can't suggest what you should look for because I see no benefit to filtering out UV rays with digital cameras (there is an internal filter in front of the sensor that does it). Some use a UV filter to protect the lens but again I disagree because of the slight color shift. You're better off with a clear glass "protector" filter.

    A skylight filter is a benefit when you're using color slide film, especially Kodachrome (which isn't even available anymore). It reduces the excessive bluishness that frequently occurs in outdoor color photography, especially in open shade under a clear, blue sky.

    I use only three types of filters. Polarizers to darken the sky or remove reflections, neutral density filters to enable a slow shutter speed with a large aperture and clear glass protectors when I'll have my camera in risky areas.
     
  11. martins

    martins TPF Noob!

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    Thats what I am thinking of getting, a Hoya Pro-1 Series UV filter.

    What about the polarized filters (I know its off topic)
     
  12. Socrates

    Socrates TPF Noob!

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    Do you have a question?
     

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