Hood? Filter?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Sarah23, Mar 4, 2008.

  1. Sarah23

    Sarah23 TPF Noob!

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    Ok...so as a newbie I didnt know about hoods and filters until a couple weeks ago. So are they worth it? Do you use a UV filter all the time when shooting outside? Can you use a filter and a hood at the same time??

    TIA!
     
  2. Socrates

    Socrates TPF Noob!

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    My opinion is that hoods are always a good idea and that they're even more important when using a filter. That's because the surface of a filter is flat, rather than curved like the front surface of a bare lens. Consequently, stray light is not deflected.

    With digital photography, the only filter that's really worthwhile is a polarizing filter and, in this day and age with auto-focus and auto-exposure, it had better be a circular polarizer.
     
  3. Sarah23

    Sarah23 TPF Noob!

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    so im guessing that causes more glare?
     
  4. gryphonslair99

    gryphonslair99 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    The only filters I use are a circular polarizer and ND filters when they are needed for what I am shooting.

    A hood for me is a requirement not an option. I also use the manufacturers recommended hood. They are designed for the lens to work the best with the particular lens and will provide good protection.

    The only exception to this rule is when I am shooting in a sports venue that requires me to use a softer rubber hood in case the action happens to get real up close and personal. No need to get a player hurt with a hard lens hood.
     
  5. Socrates

    Socrates TPF Noob!

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    In my experiences, yes.
     
  6. Sarah23

    Sarah23 TPF Noob!

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    ok, thanks so much!
     
  7. Socrates

    Socrates TPF Noob!

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    I agree fully except that I no longer use ND filters. I used them with my previous body so I could use flash with the lens wide open (to minimize DoF). My current body supports FP flash sync.
     
  8. Fally

    Fally TPF Noob!

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    What is the perceived problem with using a UV filter as a general filter all the time? I have a Hoya UV filter on my 18-200 VR and leave it there all the time. When I use my Hoya circular polarizer, I usually screw it in to the end of my UV filter. Should I not do this?

    Sorry, newb but want to know what's the most proper in this situation?

    Thanks,

    Fally
     
  9. Socrates

    Socrates TPF Noob!

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    It's never a good idea to use two filters at the same time. It will result in vignetting, not because of the glass but because of the tunnel effect caused by the two filter frames. There is no "perceived" problem with the UV filter but there is a real problem. Although barely noticeable, it does shift the color balance. Instead of the UV filter, you might consider a clear glass protector filter but don't forget to remove it when you put on the polarizer.
     
  10. Sarah23

    Sarah23 TPF Noob!

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    ok...so should I get one of those sets of 3, with the UV, Polarized and Florescent filters? Does it matter what the brand is?
     
  11. Mystwalker

    Mystwalker TPF Noob!

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    My shots are never for pro usage so I've never looked closely at possible color distortion when using a UV filter.

    I keep UV filter on lens mainly for protection, and I think one of the "L" lens require a filter to complete weather sealing - not that it matters cuz my camera is not weather sealed.
     
  12. Phranquey

    Phranquey TPF Noob!

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    Rule of thumb for a hood...

    Stand and look at your subject, and then "salute" it (put your hand to your forehead to shade your eyes). If it even makes the slightest bit of difference, you should have a hood on (which will be 90% of the time). The ONLY time I do not have a hood on is if I have the flash on-camera at wide angle. The Nikon 28-70 has such a large hood that it will cast a shadow in the bottom of the picture.

    As far as filters go, as stated already, it's not recommended to stack filters, unless you are going for something specific. I keep UV filters on all my lenses just to protect the front element from damage, and I do use a circular polarizer and ND filters on a regular basis.
     

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