Hot tips for WEDDING photography

Discussion in 'The Professional Gallery' started by Sharkbait, Apr 9, 2005.

  1. Sharkbait

    Sharkbait TPF Noob!

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    If you've got any good tips for wedding photography...good poses...good camera settings...things to do or not do...post them here! :thumbsup:


    :cheers:
    -John
     
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  2. Sharkbait

    Sharkbait TPF Noob!

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    When you're moving from indoor to outdoor portraits, ALWAYS remember to check your settings. I just blew out about 30 outdoor portraits at a wedding today because I forgot to switch from shutter priority at 1/25sec to program mode. :irked: :thumbdown:
     
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  3. Alison

    Alison Swiss Army Friend Supporting Member

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    Meet with the couple a few time and do an engagement shoot to get to know them. You're going to be spending their whole day right by their side so a good rapport is essential.

    As for shots, pretty much anything goes depending on what the couple is looking for. One of my favorites is the ring exchange. I also like to get the bride & groom from the back as they exit the church/ceremony site.
     
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  4. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    I agree. I like to meet with them in person a minimum of 2 times before the wedding, and I always point out that a benefit of an engagement or bridal portrait session before the wedding day will help them become more comfortable with me as their photographer.
     
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  5. Xmetal

    Xmetal TPF Noob!

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    Let the Professional guys do the alter shots, Sit right at the back of the church and capture the happy, smiling couple as they're leaving the church. :)
     
  6. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Ummm, the "professional" guys should get both.
     
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  7. Menard

    Menard TPF Noob!

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    Rather than post my article here, as it would be too long, I will post a link.

    Photographing a Friend's Wedding

    I wrote this article as an introduction to wedding photography for photographers who may be asked to do a friend's wedding. As such it is not a complete course in wedding photography but a collection of tips and important shots to get at a wedding.
     
  8. Christie Photo

    Christie Photo No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Not so much a "hot tip" as just "wedding basics"....

    Develop and stick to a checklist of shots for the day. Arrange the list in chronological order, leaving some blanks here and there for "write-in" special shots.

    Review the list from time to time throughout the day, and go over any needed or "missed" shots with the couple before the reception, and again before leaving. This allows them the choice of making themselves available for the photos or opting to omit them from their album.

    You will feel at ease at the end of the day knowing all the wanted photos were made.

    [​IMG]
     
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  9. mentos_007

    mentos_007 The Freshmaker!

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    That is a very useful article! Thank you for sharing! I found it really interesting, especialy because I am a total noob at shooting weddings and this summer it is ging to be my first wedding session! Ok, ok .. in two months but I'm getting prepared now!
     
  10. Slovensky

    Slovensky TPF Noob!

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    Having got married just three months ago.....my hottest tip from the 'other side of the camera' is: don't just be the photographer - be prepared to be an extra friend who is available to calm nerves and offer reassurance that the bride looks beautiful and that everything will be fine.

    I communicated a lot with my photographer by email and it felt like a friend came to shoot my wedding - which made me more relaxed in front of the camera.

    Rob "the 'tog" was wonderful, the photos are wonderful - exceeded my expectations (which were sky high) it all worked out wonderfully :mrgreen:
     
  11. Reflexions

    Reflexions TPF Noob!

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  12. Imagecapture

    Imagecapture TPF Noob!

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    I wrote this for a UK digital photography magazine recently called Digital Photographer Magazine The topic was how to improve the amateur photographers wedding photography techniques.

    12 Tips on shooting more creative wedding photographs - written for amateur photographers wishing to enhance their skills at wedding photography for Onlineweddings, Wedding Photographers London & UK, USA, Caribbean & Worldwide Directories (inspired by Bambi Cantrell).

    1/ The use of the widest aperture your lens permits (creating a narrow depth of field) can create a very appealing effect for wedding photography making the background blurred and your subject in focus. Make sure you carefully focus on your subject though or you'll end up with lots of out of focus images!
    Most proffessional lenses go to 2.8 but if you're not able to use 2.8 just use the widest possible.

    2/ As long as lighting conditions allow it (e.g. above example) try and shoot as many shots as you can without the use of flash for giving your images a more ambient natural look. You'll need to up your ISO rating to compensate possibly but the use of flash can kill an image if it's not balanced properly.

    3/ If using flash try and use a slow shutter speed e.g. 1/25 - 1/30 to make the most of ambient lighting. If your flash permits it increase the power by one stop to freeze the image movement if the subjects are moving.

    4/ For flattering images of brides make sure they never have their arms bent (a slight bend is best-but not straight!) while holding her bouquet and if possible ask her to create an 'S' bend with her body similar to the way fashion models pose. Read though womens magazines like Vogue and Cosmopolitan to see how the models pose to get an idea.

    5/ Try and make the most of strong architectural lines e.g.pillars for backdrops to your wedding photographs when possible. Remember if you sort out the background the foreground falls into place to create the perfect composition.

    6/ If there are any interesting light patterns outisde the church or registary office you can use this to add impact and drama to your images.

    7/ Camera tilt adds a sense of motion to an image; this works on some shots very well-you don't have to always keep the camera landscape or portrait format, be adventurous and align the composition lines at diagonals in the image to create impact. As with all techniques don't over do this however, 1-2 images is ample.

    8/ Use Black & White film or if using digital camera you can convert certain images to B&W to give a sense of reportage style and impact. Judge the use of using B&W well-if the subject has strong colours you may want to keep the image as it is.

    9/ Don't be afraid to zoom in on details like the bride and groom holding hands or as they put the ring on;close-ups of the nervous look on the grooms face as he eagerly waits his bride before the ceremony or simply a flower arrangement that catches your eye-a lot of money is spent on wedding flowers and it's nice to show the couple simple generic images that bring back memories. Some photographers take still life shots of the brides shoes or if her dress has an unusual feature.

    10/ If you're shooting a wedding on a day with very strong sunshine try and move the couple/group into the shade for a better exposure using fill in flash to balance the scene.

    11/ When taking pictures of the couple with their bridal car-try being creative using the windows to frame people or even jump inside the car and get a shot of the couple outside the window framing them with the window frame etc.

    12/ Try experimenting taking pictures of the first dance using a very slow shutter speed giving your images a sense of movement and if possible use only ambient light to accentuate the mood.

    There are some excellent wedding photography books on the market for inspiring wedding photographers. For more ideas and tips I highly recommend looking at Bambi Cantrells books (acclaimed Wedding Photographer and member of Onlineweddings) which have been a major inspiration to me and thousands of other wedding photographers in the business. Her first book ‘The Art of Wedding Photography’ is a must have and just about to be released is a book specifically for digital wedding photography aptly named‘The Art of Digital Wedding Photography’ .

    Recommended Gadgets for photographers:

    1/ If they haven’t yet got one-a flash diffuser box to attach to the flash head.

    2/ A stobeframe. A frame which you attach the flash unit on which lifts the flash a few inches above the lens eliminating shadows on the subject. This frame works on a hinge mechanism and enables you to move the flash for portrait shots or landscape format shots accordingly.
     
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