How do you keep both foreground and background in focus?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by keller, Feb 15, 2006.

  1. keller

    keller TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2005
    Messages:
    105
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've recently seen some photos where you can see the 5m close rocks as clearly as the 50km mountains.

    How do people do this? Is there some kind of trick with the focusing lenses? I can only seem to focus on 1 area.
     
  2. 'Daniel'

    'Daniel' TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2004
    Messages:
    1,507
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    You need to use a small aperture (large f/number) and that will force a slower shutter speed.
     
  3. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2005
    Messages:
    6,217
    Likes Received:
    134
    Location:
    London
  4. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2004
    Messages:
    4,237
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Rochester, NY Velocity: Unknown
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Wide angle lenses also have a bigger DOF for a given aperture. You won't see the effect aperture has on DOF in your viewfinder unless you have the DOF preview option. Most cameras view through the lens at the widest aperture and then stop down to the set aperture when you hit the shutter. DOF preview will go to the set aperture so you can see what you are getting (but it will be darker and harder to see).
     
  5. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2004
    Messages:
    5,346
    Likes Received:
    65
    Location:
    Santa Barbara, CA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Here's a link to a great article: http://luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/understanding-series/dof.shtml

    And Mark, this is something you might find interesting. The assertion that wide angle lenses give a greater depth of field is a misconception, shared by most if not all photographers, myself included until reading this article.

    http://luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/dof2.shtml

    I know I have been surpised before, while shooting with a 17mm lens at f/8 and thinking I had infinite depth of field to cover everything in the scene, and then getting back to the computer and seeing the trees in the far off distance slightly blurred.
     
  6. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2004
    Messages:
    4,237
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Rochester, NY Velocity: Unknown
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Cool. I had always wondered about that, thinking that it might be chalked up to the fact that distance gets exagerated, but this is the first time time I've seen someone spell it out. I hate forwarding bad info simply because it's what everyone else says, so I'm glad you pointed that out.
     
  7. keller

    keller TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2005
    Messages:
    105
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey guys, thanks for the advice. I've noticed having wider angle lens does help. Luckily I've also got the DOF button (although it doesnt seem to help with smaller apetures, since its too dark to see properly).

    When I'm trying to get the foreground and background in focus, should I focus on something in between for best effect?
     
  8. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2005
    Messages:
    6,217
    Likes Received:
    134
    Location:
    London
    Read the article I posted, it answers this question precisely.

    Rob
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page
background and foreground in focus
,
focus background and foreground
,
focus foreground and background
,
foreground and background in focus
,

how to focus background and foreground

,
how to focus foreground and background
,
how to focus on foreground and background
,
how to get background and foreground in focus
,

how to get foreground and background in focus

,

how to keep foreground and background in focus