Images (EXIF)

Discussion in 'Digital Discussion & Q&A' started by NiKOnSLR, Oct 27, 2009.

  1. NiKOnSLR

    NiKOnSLR TPF Noob!

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    Hey guys,

    I'm not sure how to ask this question but I will try to ask the best I can.

    Is there a book or a website that display images taken by people or professionals and it also gives you the exif? I'm looking for this because I would like to have some examples and how to set the camera to obtain a similar shot.
     
  2. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    All the EXIF can tell you is how to duplicate the exposure, if that.

    BUT, all you need is an EXIF reader to view the EXIF data if it wasn't stripped out of an image. www.opanda.org is one of several free EXIF readers available online.

    You should also be aware that there are also EXIF writers that can be used to change the EXIF data to something other than the actual parameters that were used.

    If you google EXIF you'll get 3,120,000 hits with #1 being www.EXIF.org the unofficial site dedicated to EXIF and related resources.
     
  3. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Flickr displays any exif data that is embedded in images on the right hand side.

    But really KmH is right. You're going about it the wrong way if you think that knowing the camera settings will reverse engineer the picture. Even many of the top wedding photographers will be shooting in aperture priority with the exposure on auto, knowing exact settings is rarely important, compared to knowing how to replicate an effect. The camera makes most things automatic.

    For instance you don't need to know that a photographer shot at f/2.0, but rather need to know that the very narrow depth of field is likely a result of a wide aperture.
    Same with shutter speed. Look at the blur around the photos and don't get too hung up on the numbers.
    Is the scene dark? Maybe the camera was set to auto with exposure compensation.

    If you have any really specific questions on how an effect was achieved then post a link to the image and ask on this forum. :)
     
  4. NiKOnSLR

    NiKOnSLR TPF Noob!

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    THanks.

    That sounds like a better idea.
     

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