metadata conversion question

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by mapgirl, Sep 13, 2007.

  1. mapgirl

    mapgirl TPF Noob!

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    When I look at the metadata in Photoshop Elements (4) for the focal length I used for particular shots, the number doesn't make sense to me. For instance, what would 13.40mm mean in 35 mm camera terms? Is there a conversion formula I can use? I'm trying to see what focal lengths I actually use most of the time.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Sideburns

    Sideburns TPF Noob!

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    I'm going to assume that it's saying 13.4mm...

    What type of camera are you using? There's a difference, because lots of P+S cameras have a HUGE crop factor.
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Most cameras do have a 'conversion factor' to bring things back into 35mm film terms...but it's nothing more than a comparison...not really all that useful. That number would tell you where you were in your zoom range.
     
  4. mapgirl

    mapgirl TPF Noob!

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    That is what I want to know in terms of choosing the right lens for a new dslr. The data I'm looking at is for my Canon Power Shot A70. It has the equivalent of a 35-105 zoom (or so it says). Is there any way I can interpret the metadata on a particular picture so I can see what focal length I was using?
    OR is the 35-105 zoom of a P & S not at all the same as a 35-105 zoom for a dslr?
     
  5. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Well...the 35-105 equivalent is for the field of view...which should help you decide on a lens for a DSLR...but remember that everything is compared back to 35mm film, and most DSLRs have a conversion or 'crop' factor as well.

    Think about it this way. Stand in one spot and zoom your camera to the wide end, take a photo. This is the field of view that you would get with a 35mm lens on a 35mm film camera. The zoom all the way out, take a photo, this is the field of view that you would get with a 135mm lens on a 35mm camera.

    Now, to figure out what that would mean on a Canon Rebel XTi, for example. The 'crop' factor for that camera is 1.6...so to get the equivalent FOV of 35mm...you would need a 21mm lens. To get the equivalent FOV of 135mm...you would need an 85mm lens.

    A close match to this would be the Canon 17-85 lens, on any of the lower or mid level Canon DSLR cameras.
     
  6. mapgirl

    mapgirl TPF Noob!

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    Thank you again! This is what I wanted to know (and what I wanted to hear :boogie:). I did order the 17-85 but started rethinking (OVERthinking) it after more of the posts in the other string and looking yet again at too many reviews. Funny, I don't remember sweating so much over buying my old Pentax slr or my PowerShot. As I said in another string, there is such a thing as too much information :mrgreen:. But you've answered my question and settled my stomach. :bouncy:
     

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