New and I need help!

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by dixieschick27, Jul 2, 2009.

  1. dixieschick27

    dixieschick27 TPF Noob!

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    I have a canon EOS rebel k2 35mm. I am very new at this so I am trying to figure out what to do to get my photos to not be so grainey looking. Do I need to use a certain kind of film or something.
     
  2. dxqcanada

    dxqcanada Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Grainy looking pictures can be caused by:

    High ISO film
    Under exposure
    Print size

    If you use films 800 ISO and higher ... they will be grainy

    If you under-expose your shots ... most photofinisher's will attempt to print them light to be more acceptable. This causes the images to look grainy.

    If you are looking closely at a large print you will see pronounced film grain.
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Welcome to the forum.

    For us to properly diagnose the issue, it would really help if we could see the photos.
    http://www.thephotoforum.com/forum/...15-how-do-i-do-pictorial-guide-using-tpf.html

    As a rule of thumb, lower ISO film will be less grainy. So rather than 800 film, use 100.

    My guess is that your shots are grainy because of exposure problems. For example, when your shots are underexposed, the lab will try to correct that when they make your prints. The result of trying to brighten an underexposed image, is often that it will be quite grainy.

    My suggestion would be to shoot a roll of film and record the settings (aperture and shutter speed). Then when you take the film to be developed, ask for 'no corrections'. This should help you to see which shots are under/over exposed....and maybe help you to see which situations tend to give you those types of shots.
    From there, you can start learning about metering and proper exposure.
     

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