New Camera, what lenses?

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by Graelwyn, Jan 10, 2007.

  1. Graelwyn

    Graelwyn TPF Noob!

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    I finally made my decision and opted for a Nikon D200 which is now sat in my bag along with my old Nikkor AF 75-250 and a Tamron 19-35mm. I was told this gives me a good range, considering that with the old AF lenses, the range is longer or something? So my question is, what other lenses would I really benefit from? I am not very experienced on lenses and which ones would add up to a good kit.

    I like portraiture, abstract and landscape work best. Of course, I would love one of those VR lenses, but simply to expensive for me right now.
     
  2. JIP

    JIP No longer a newbie, moving up!

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  3. Jeremy Z

    Jeremy Z No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I agree with JIP. You have a huge gap between 35mm and 75mm. Your 19mm is going to be more like a 28mm now, and your 75 will be more like a 105mm.

    That is a kick-butt camera, to be sure. Don't skimp on the optics. Consider the Tamron normal zoom with the fixed f/2.8 aperture. This can replace the fixed 50mm in all but the lowest light in handheld conditions. But the 50mm is so reasonably priced, you don't really have to make the choice of which one to get, but which one to get first. I think it's an 18-55? This will cover your basic wide angle and your portrait lens. Sell the Tamron 19-35 and buy a wide angle zoom that is actually a wide angle with the new camera.

    You are aware that your camera effectively multiplies the focal length of your lenses by 1.5, right?

    So you are fine with telephoto.

    If you really like architecture, you should seriously consider a tilt/shift lens.

    Short version: Tamron 18-55 f/2.8, for portaits and all around stuff.
    Next, a tilt-shift lens for architecture.
    Next, 50 mm f/1.8 for low light or a fixed portrait lens.
    Next, a proper wide angle for the digital size sensor.
     
  4. Graelwyn

    Graelwyn TPF Noob!

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    Thanks, that 18-55 will be the first I look for, tilt shift lens...can you explain more about this to me as I have not heard of it, but I do love architectural photography. 50mm is one I am familiar with.
     
  5. Jeremy Z

    Jeremy Z No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Tilt/shift basically allows you to move the front part of the lens up or down while the rear part stays stationary. This means that as you're looking up at a building from ground level, you can make it so the lines of the building don't converge.

    If you go to Nikon's website and look up their tilt/shift lenses, I'll bet they have example photos.
     
  6. thebeginning

    thebeginning TPF Noob!

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    i don't believe nikon makes any tilt-shift lenses (?)

    you'd have to get an adapter and a MF lens, or perhaps a nikon f mount to canon EOS mount adapter...
     
  7. midget patrol

    midget patrol TPF Noob!

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    If they do, they're not prominently advertised.

    50mm 1.8, definetly. With that lens plus the two you already have, you should have a good place to start. You'll start to notice limitations eventually once you start doing more specialized shooting. Once you're really sure you know what you want to shoot, it's easier to shop for lenses.
     
  8. Jeremy Z

    Jeremy Z No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Here's one, an 85mm f/2.8, macro/shift:

    [​IMG]

    http://www.nikonusa.com/template.php?cat=1&grp=5&productNr=1458

    I don't even want to know how much it costs. My wallet hurts just to think of it.

    Its funny though that they advertise it as an architecture lens. 85mm? You'd never get most buildings in a city environment in that frame. It seems like 24 o4 28mm would've been a better choice, and just ditch the macro stuff.
     
  9. JIP

    JIP No longer a newbie, moving up!

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  10. nakedyak

    nakedyak TPF Noob!

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    sounds like the Tamron 28-75mm f2.8 would work well for his purposes, filling the gap between 35mm and 75mm nicely. they make it for nikon right?
     

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