Nikon D60, D80, or D200?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by christianoutdoorsguy, Sep 5, 2008.

  1. christianoutdoorsguy

    christianoutdoorsguy TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2008
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Arizona
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I am just getting into photography. Looking to get telephoto lenses primarily for outdoors and far distances. Just got a good price on a D60 but was told I am very limited on the lenses I can use for this and only the Dx's will work. I am not too deep yet to look at a D80 or D200. Would I be much better off with one of 80 or 200? Like I said just getting into it but if it is like everything else I do I will dive in deep quickly. Would rather start out right then want to upgrade in 6 mos (like I am doing already). Just wondering what the advantages are to the 80 and 200. I am considering both. Please help this super newb. Thank you.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2008
  2. rubbertree

    rubbertree TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2007
    Messages:
    727
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    well, start off by researching them both. What do you need in a camera? I would think that a 200 is going overboard for a newbie.
     
  3. epp_b

    epp_b No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Messages:
    2,135
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    True North Cold and Freezing
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Not quite.

    "DX" is Nikon's way of saying "APS-C" or "crop sensor". A Nikon DX lens will work on DX bodies and FX (Nikon's "full frame sensor" term) digital bodies -- Nikon FX digital bodies can recognize when a DX lens is mounted and use only a cropped portion of the sensor -- but not on Nikon film cameras. They will mount, but they will cause severe vignetting. No big deal if you don't ever plan on using Nikon 35mm film cameras (I don't). You can use non-DX lenses on a DX body without any problems.

    On the D60, You can actually use just about any Nikon lens made in the last 50 years, it's a matter of what features you'll able to use. The main limitation (which is what I think you were trying to ask) with the D60 is that you can only use autofocus with AF-I and AF-S lenses, of which there aren't that many (yet), because the D60 does not have an internal, screwdriver-coupled focus motor.

    The D80 and D200, however, do have a built-in focus motor and, therefore, can autofocus with any of the AF lenses since the 80's. They will also work perfectly with the AF-I and AF-S lenses.

    Your description of yourself sounds just like me (wasn't really that "into" photography when I got my D40, but I should have known better with my history of liking things with lights and buttons and otherwise artsy-fartsy things).

    If you're cheap, forget the D60, get the D40. There's very little in the D60 that warrants the price hike over the D40. The D40 is actually more capable in some respects.

    If you're willing to spend more, learn from my mistake and get the D80. It's a wiser investment in the Nikon system as you'll have a much wider selection of full-featured lenses. But, if you can wait a bit, the D80 should drop in price because of the introduction of the D90.

    The D200 is a great camera, for sure, but unnecessary as a first camera.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2008
  4. andrew99

    andrew99 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2008
    Messages:
    672
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    All of them use DX lenses (meaning the sensor is smaller than 35 mm film). The D60 is the only one you mention which doesn't have an autofocus motor built into the body, so it will only autofocus with lenses that have the motor built in (many high end lenses from Nikon and several 3rd parties have this and will work perfectly). Since the D60 doesn't have the autofocus motor, it is smaller, lighter and cheaper than the others, which is good or bad depending on your perspective, I guess (some people prefer a larger, heavier camera). The D200 is a great camera, but I would recommend you go with the D80 or D60 and spend the difference on a good lens.
     
  5. djacobox372

    djacobox372 No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    May 4, 2008
    Messages:
    2,925
    Likes Received:
    129
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    The big advantage of the D200, besides build quality, is it's ability to light-meter with non-cpu lenses... only the nikon d300, and d3 can also do that.

    The comment that you can use 50 year old lenses on a d60 is only true in that you can mount it and shoot (true for all nikon dslrs)--but you have to use manual and you have no light metering info to go off of (besides checking the photo and adjusting).

    With the d200 and a non-cpu lens you get light metering info in M, and you can also shoot in aperture priority "auto" mode.
     
  6. TamiyaGuy

    TamiyaGuy No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2007
    Messages:
    1,078
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Chelmsford, UK
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I guess it all depends on what you want in a camera, although I would cut the D200 out of the equation: If you want to go further with your photography, a used D300 would be better.

    So, between the D80 and D60. The D80 has a few features that the D60 doesn't, and vice versa. However, the features the D80 has can be very useful. The D80 has a built-in focusing motor, which means that it can auto-focus with any lens prefixed with "AF" (AF, AF-D, AF-S, etc). However, the D60 does NOT have a built-in focusing motor, which means that it can only autofocus with AF-I or AF-S type lenses. AF or AF-D lenses can still be used in any mode, but you'll need to manually focus (for instance, the highly acclaimed "Nifty Fifty" 50mm f/1.8).

    In my opinion, if you're leaning towards the D80, then get that. If, however, you're leaning towards the D60, I would recommend skipping that and getting the D40. Although it has less pixels (which really isn't that bad; 30 x 20" prints should still be acceptable), it is cheaper, has generally crisper images, and has a 1/500s flash sync speed. Also remember that a camera is only as good as its lenses, so if you can only just afford the D80, you might want to get a D40 and spend the cash on a couple of lenses.
     
  7. christianoutdoorsguy

    christianoutdoorsguy TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2008
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Arizona
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    There is some great info and responses here, I appreciate the help. This has definitely helped me. When do you think the D80 will go down in price? Below is a link that Ritz Camera is having a 200.00 off sale + a 50.00 gift certificate, essentially making it 250.00 off the camera. It is a D80 w/ an 18-135mm F/3.5-5.6G ED-IF AF-S for basically 849.98 new if I am reading this correctly. Is this a good price? Do you think they'll be lower once the D90 hits? Here is a link, it says a 1 week sale only.

    http://www.ritzcamera.com/product/SLR1147.htm?bct=t1134

    It sounds like the D80 is really what I am after and the D200 is a bit much. I am having a dilema though and only because of price, there is a place where I can get a gently used D200 body for 750.00 and most of the D80 body's I see are 650.00-725.00 for the used body. If I am in the same price range should I consider the D200 or will it really even benefit me at this point, the only reason I am really even considering the D200 at this point is because it is virtually the same price. Thanks again.

     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2008
  8. Samriel

    Samriel TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2007
    Messages:
    325
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Fukuoka, Japan
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    My opinion:

    D200 -> D80 -> D60

    I use a D80, and I'm very happy with it, but if I had the money at the time, I would've gone for a used D200 (about USD700~800 now). I don't consider the D200 too much for a newbie, being one myself, and it's not so much "harder" to use than the D80. Just a bit different. The build quality is a big plus IMO, and I'd like to be able to use non-CPU lenses properly.
    As somebody else mentioned, a used D300 is also an option if you have the cash. Just be sure you have some cash left for some good lenses. I would definitively suggest you to stay away from the D60 - an hour of playing with the D80, D200 or D300 and you'll know why.
     
  9. Early

    Early TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2008
    Messages:
    1,240
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Western NJ
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    IMHO, if you really dig photography, opt for the D200 now. Six months from now, you'll be glad you did. Just make sure you're not getting a lemon.
     
  10. anubis404

    anubis404 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2008
    Messages:
    955
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Ds will work too. Your big limitation on the D60 is the lack of in body AF motor, which will really limit your selection of telephoto lenses. I wouldn't recommend this camera for outdoors and far distances for that reason.


    The D80 is newer, and carries many of the features of the D200.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

better for a beginner d60 d80

,

d-60 o d-80