questions about dry image transfers

Discussion in 'Alternative Techniques & Photo Gallery' started by photog5050, Sep 14, 2005.

  1. photog5050

    photog5050 TPF Noob!

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    well i have the kathleen kor "image transfers" book for some 3 years and always looked through it but recently i read it more and more and would like to do some personal work and have some questions about some things that were not clear in the book.
    -my interest is more toward dry image transfers and wanted to know the technique for this?
    -i would like to use these in an album of ours (me and wife) which is a henzo and uses black paper which is somewaht textured, but not like handmade paper.
    will the colors show on this black paper?
    -do i need to use UV protection or can i leave it as is and not worry?

    any help appreciated
     
  2. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Have you done image transfers the more traditional way, soaking the receptor sheet first? Once you've gotten a good feel for this technique, then it's time to move onto dry transfers, or you might find yourself very frustrated. Just a thought before you begin, anyway.

    I've done a few with nice results. They render a sharper, more photographic image since your receptor sheet is kept dry. I would definitely recommend hot-pressed watercolor paper for a first try, since it's very smooth and you'll need that advantage at first. I don't know what kind of paper you are referring to in your album - are you saying you'd open the album and put the image transfer directly on this black paper? hmmm......might be effective for some images, might look terrible for others. Black is black - of course it's going to have an impact. Again - I'd try several with HP WC paper, Arches is a solid brand name.

    The technique is basically the same, you just don't soak the paper - hence "dry" transfer. Keep it warm, and peel off very slowly at first - and be prepared to see a LOT of liftoff. ;) Again, sometimes it looks awesome, but sometimes too much of the image is gone to be effective. Be selective about what images you choose.

    Yes - generally UV spray is advisable - unless you don't mind seeing the colors fade, which again can also look very nice and impart a natural mellowness to the end result. But the protection is usually best. Your choice.

    Hope this helps! Good luck with it. :thumbup:
     
  3. photog5050

    photog5050 TPF Noob!

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    Have you done image transfers the more traditional way, soaking the receptor sheet first?
    i have never tried it before, but like i said, i have the book for 3 years and took interest to it lately, so i want to pursue it. i never do anything unless i know all about it first. so i have amny questions before i try.

    Once you've gotten a good feel for this technique, then it's time to move onto dry transfers, or you might find yourself very frustrated. Just a thought before you begin, anyway.
    why would dry transfers be more difficult then the delicate emulsion transfer? BTW, there are other dry transfers besides the peel, heat ,paste roll method?

    I've done a few with nice results.
    what tchnique do you use?

    They render a sharper, more photographic image.
    this is what i want. something different but believable . not to wierd like the emultion transfers, which gets all distorted. but mainly, because i'm not sure the paper is made to be dipped in water. it's an album paper with parchment in between which is glued to each page. you use glue to mount the photos.

    I would definitely recommend hot-pressed watercolor paper for a first try, since it's very smooth and you'll need that advantage at first.
    i want to transfer 6 , 3X4" prints on each album paper in 2 rows, like a collage. i don't want to have a background watercolor that holds each print and then paste them to the album. i would like all the dry transfers on one page..btw, do dry transfers show well on black paper. will the black bleed through the transfer (does it have transparacy to it?) making it look to dark or is it vivid enough to show through?

    I don't know what kind of paper you are referring to in your album - are you saying you'd open the album and put the image transfer directly on this black paper?
    yes please!

    hmmm......might be effective for some images, might look terrible for others.why?

    and be prepared to see a LOT of liftoff.
    i saw some very nice dry transfers of an artist in the book that had almost no liftoff. how does he do it that i won't be able to?

    Be selective about what images you choose.
    as i am a wedding photographer i though to possibly put it the B&G album...


    any help appreciated
     
  4. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    If you've never done any of it before, then start. Do as all of us did. You've had the book for three years; I am familiar with the book and there is a Resource Index in the back. Gather the supplies you'll need and begin! Only when you begin doing them will you figure out what works best for you.

    Do it all, if you're interested. I used this book as a guide, but nothing beats actually doing it.

    I don't know what kind of paper you are referring to in your album - are you saying you'd open the album and put the image transfer directly on this black paper?
    yes please! <<--Then try it out, just to see. :)

    hmmm......might be effective for some images, might look terrible for others.why? <<<--- Because some images will show more of the black bleeding through, and it may not look as good with some images as with others. You probably have images in mind for this technique - think about the lightest tonal range and realize that it will not be light if transferred to dark paper. It's that simple.

    what tchnique do you use? <<---I followed the technique as outlined in the book.

    Good luck!
     
  5. photog5050

    photog5050 TPF Noob!

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    thanks for all the help Terri. i just like knowing i know as much as possible before i jump in the water..
    i was thinking of doing 3.25X4.25 prints and possibly go to 4X5's. what printer would you recommend for me?
    thanks again.

    btw, is that pug your dog? these are mine...
    http://www.i-dog.com/board/messages/5462/109923.html
     
  6. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Yes, this is Odin the pug. He is quite the character! ;) Your dog looks very regal in your pictures.

    I use an Epson 2200 photo printer. I work with 4x5 Polaroid sheet film and have come to enjoy it over the 669. I use a Daylab slide printer so my images are from slide film.

    Again, everything I've mentioned you will find referenced in the Carr book. She is an expert, and quite talented.

    Good luck! Have fun with it. :D
     

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