Shooting Sports

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by leopardforest, Sep 20, 2007.

  1. leopardforest

    leopardforest TPF Noob!

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    I recently got on my college's yearbook staff as the head photographer. I am in charge of getting photos for the yearbook and I need some advice on how to shoot sports. Soccer and rugby are our big field sports and I have never shot sports before. Any tips for me? Also anyone have any experience in this type of position and how to run it? I do have some other photographers on my team.


    Thanks!!!
     
  2. Sw1tchFX

    Sw1tchFX TPF Noob!

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    I shot Football and Basketball a little bit about a year ago and I learned that not only is a D70 and screwdriver f/2.8 telephoto a bad combination for speed, but you should anticipate the action instead of chase it.
     
  3. ScottS

    ScottS TPF Noob!

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    I would talk to the other photographers on the staff and see what they can do. Also, what equipment do you have/ have access to?
     
  4. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Try to shoot the sport itself and not the people. I got caught in this in my first sport and ended up with a lot of photos of people doing things but ultimately none that show what were happening.

    A person running around may look good, but a person running around with the ball looks even better.
     
  5. DHammer

    DHammer TPF Noob!

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    Three suggestions. Learn the sport, learn the basics and the most common rules this will help you anticipate the action. Second learn your team, watch your team practice learn a few of their best plays (this will also greatly help you anticipate), also learn who the stars are thats where alot of te action will be. And lastly don't forget the bench, there is a lot of emotion there and that makes great photos. The bench will usually celebrate a great play more than the players on the field.

    Hope this helps
    Dennis
     
  6. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    hmm, if you are a group of photographers, place yourself well, one photographer alone cannot be in the ideal position for all the action that will be going on, but if you are three or more your chances are good.

    I would do some training first, place some people close to the hot spots (goal and such), work with long lenses to get close into the action (depending on the light, lenses should be fast as well...). But it is nice to also have one camera with a shorter lens, to get images which show some more of the context and give an overview.

    And as mentioned, follow the ball, not the people ;)

    recent example:
    http://www.thephotoforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=94114
     
  7. leopardforest

    leopardforest TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for all the replies! Here's the thing... I have an XTi with a Sigma 17-70 Wide angle and a Canon nifty 50, the school has a XT and the kit lens. The other photographers on my team dont really have any experience what so ever. I myself have limited experience, but I am using this as a leaning experience. So I am going to be able to get school to buy a longer lens so that will help. Any suggestions for lenses (under $400)? But as far as shooting in failing light what it is the trick? I had my XTi at 1600iso and f/4.5 the lowest at 70mm and I couldnt get a fast enough shutter speed. How do the pro do it?
     
  8. DeepSpring

    DeepSpring TPF Noob!

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    50mm f/1.8 is good for basketball and not bad at volley ball tho a Little longer is nice too. You are going to want a flash for your night time field sports for sure and depending on your gym you might, I need one. I have shot football and soccer during the day time with my 70-200 f/4 L and I have been pretty happy. Sometimes I wish I had a bit more reach but I have been able to crop a little without quality loss. I haven't yet had to tackle a night time game tho.

    Like mentioned learn the basics of the sport and contently move down the field. Stay ahead of the ball and let the action come to you.

    Also PAY ATTENTION!!!!!!!!! Never take your eyes off the field/ court during a play. I've seen photographers turn around for a second and then get tackled by a few football players going out of bounds. I've had a few close calls. Best thing to do is when you set up in your spot try and make sure there is no one behind you so if need be you can jump back.
     
  9. itoncool

    itoncool TPF Noob!

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    I did take our high school soccer event long time ago, still using film body (plus a lot of films) and manual focus lens, mine was 35-105, I found that my lens was not long enough to get closer look of the action, the field is too wide. So, I checked who were the best player first, what was his position on the field, then get near to his area. I assume best player are more likely to have the ball from his team mates. Always be ready for the action, and don't be lazy to get into the game, sometimes your best player are not in the good form. Then, you have to switch to the brighter player of the day.

    For soccer, the goal is the most important thing, it's rare so don't miss the moment, I always put 1 photographer each goal post, his only job is taking the action in the striking zone, and corner as well. Post goal expression also nice to shoot.

    Never had experience with rugby, but maybe similar strategy.

    PS: Set your speed min 1/125 (I did min 1/250, thanks to the bright sun) they have incredibly fast movement. Longer lens surely a BIG help.
     
  10. Keith Gebhardt

    Keith Gebhardt TPF Noob!

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    a lens for 400 or less is gonna be really hard for shooting football and rugby. When your shooting those sports you want to focus on the players. not whats goin on around them. usally. For instance, the oposing team throws the ball and your team grabs a nice intercept. you want to be focused on the interceptor as hes receiving the ball. so you can see it. you dont want the whole feild in the picture. You need to look at your options and pick what would best suit your needs. Definately find a lense with at least f./2.8 for alot of sports events are under low light conditions. even with the stadium lights. with that lower f. stop you gain greater dof to help blur out the backround busyness. and helps you maintain a faster shutter speed for a sharper, and less blurry of an image. Another thing.. how far will you be from the players? if your doing it for the school youll definately be able to get onto the feild from the sideline.. i would imagine. if not.. you need to take that into consideration. Ive shot sports with my nikons 18-200mm f/3.5 and it barely did the job. i had to be right on the sideline.. and i was only able to shoot 1st quarter or the pictures would come out a bit soft from slower shutter. I recently purchased a nice 120-300mm f/2.8 sigma APO EX DG HSM lense. i love it. and if you get a 1.4x teleconverter you can esily make it 240 - 600mm at f/4 which is still decent, then in the day its amazing.
     
  11. Keith Gebhardt

    Keith Gebhardt TPF Noob!

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    also.. get a tripod or monopod.. i use monopod for its quick and easy to move around. and if you need to get low, it colasps quickly.
     
  12. MikeR

    MikeR TPF Noob!

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    Try to get the players face in the shot. You will be able to capture emotion. Having the ball in the shot is also a plus.
     

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