slr photography - video photography relation

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by ognistik, Sep 13, 2007.

  1. ognistik

    ognistik TPF Noob!

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    What is the relation between photography and the photography we see in video? How do they work together and how do they differ other than in motion?

    I know about photography, I own a dSLR and even though I don't do the most professional photography I do understand composition, aperture, depth of field, white balance, shutter speed, ISO, lighting, techniques achieved through these and a couple more stuff... now, I've never had a video camera in my hands (well... maybe once).

    is it too hard to apply the knowledge I have about photography to video cameras? Like lighting and DOF has to be somehow related, please tell me what you think and if you know about any online resources that can help...




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    reason for question: I opened my mouth in my Broadcasting class saying I knew some photography and now I am the photography director for a project... have no idea what Im going to do
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Some of the elements are obvious quite similar. Composition, lighting etc....but things like lighting are also different because flash works for still but not for video. I don't know much about videography...but I too have been curious about it. I would think that there are plenty of resources avaliable...probably some forums like this one...but for video.
     
  3. LokiZ

    LokiZ TPF Noob!

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    Alot actually depends on the camera. Same as we have p/s and SLR their are better cameras out their for more manual shooting or just capturing family memories in the park during the brightest part of the day. Remember this if nothing else. Many many models do perfectly well in ample lighting conditions, test in low light situations and test with a tape not just the view finder.

    I have Sony DCR-VX2100 which is considered presumer but is revered as a pretty good one though. While prosumer may not be what you need, a few reasons I chose the camera I did which can be transfered over to making your decision is this.

    Light, light, light - you need it lot's of it and if you don't you are much more limited in what you can film and still be happy with results. noise is exagerated on video as compared to still cameras.

    If you do have a camera that allows you to change your shutter speed then video vs. stills reacts much in the same manner. Slower shutter speed = more light and vice versa also trailing can be seen with slow shutter speed and with a higher shutter speed video also may look choppy. Another thing that can be seen quite well is shifting of color or loss of saturation with higher shutter speeds.

    Glass is very important as in most camcorders the les is not removable. Other then Canon prosumer or any brand in the professional market.

    (My prosumer cost about $1800) Concerning light. Lux rating can be important for low light shooting (the lower the better) but I would advise that you find a vendor and prove the camera out yourself even if you do not plan to buy the camera from the vendor. (you know what is acceptable to you.)

    Also many cameras I have found do not have what would be considered a user friendly manual focus. This makes how your camera reacts to low light and distant objects very important. Poor systems float in and out of focus which can ruin shots regardless of lighting and composition.

    As far as DOF many of the consumer models what would appear larger aperture. Still it is possible just a matter of how many menu hoops you have to jump through to get there.

    Which brings me to my last point... camera interface. make sure your camera has the settings you need easily accessible many models hide the "many" functions to deep to be practical.

    I will look for some resources form you after I get home from work!
     
  4. ognistik

    ognistik TPF Noob!

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    I appreciate your time on answering, really

    thanks a lot for the bunch of helpful information. For the project I have my hands on now I'll be using equipment of the University. Even though I have never had a video camera, well, I can borrow them as much as I want and probably before shooting anything I'll try to get to know the camera as much as I will be able to. For what I know one of the cameras I can borrow is a Sony with cost between $ 5000 and $ 6000 ... I don't remember the model or anything but I guess it's a good camera (it's expensive), the guy that showed it to me told he didn't even know half of the functions.

    thank you so much, I would appreciate online links if any of you has any
     
  5. skieur

    skieur TPF Noob!

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    After already being a photographer, I studied television and film production out of interest at College. Some of the best courses I took were from producers and directors in financing, planning, scriptwriting, organizing, directing and postproduction. These were absolutely essential and I went on to actual work as a producer and director in both television and film. Needless to say I also got considerable experience as a camera operator, soundman and lighting specialist, and in postproduction editing.

    Videography is somewhat similar to television and film production in that you need this same kind of experience and knowledge of planning, scripting, and technique to put together a top quality video.

    So, I highly recommend that you take some courses. I took mine at night while I was still working during the day and they really helped me diversify from photography into multimedia work.

    skieur
     

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