Some questions about settings, point and shoots, and SLR's

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Thor06, Mar 28, 2007.

  1. Thor06

    Thor06 TPF Noob!

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    Hey guys, I have a slew of questions for you all. I have taken a recent interest in photography. I have been using my digital point and shoots for several years but I am getting to be interested in investing in a SLR. I came very close to getting a Canon Rebel T2 (film SLR) but I didnt because I cant really afford to shell out a bunch of money for something I know little about. Well anyway, all this got me looking into ISO speeds, f numbers, and shutter speeds and what they all mean.

    I have a pretty good general idea what everything is now, at least I think I do. Well, I know what everything has to do with but I am still completely oblivious as to how you all seem to know exactly what aparture, shutter speed, and film speed with yeild quality results. Can anyone briefly clue me in or point me to a good, informative book? Hopefully I will be able to take a class on this but next semester isnt looking too good.

    As I am finding out what all this means, I started looking at my own camera, a Kodak Easyshare C875. I love the camera, though it eats batteries like no other. Anyway, I noticed there is a few shooting settings, the Auto, a Scene Slection one, and then there is one called PASM. I never knew what it was talking about, but I messed with it and found it took a bit better pictures in there usually. Once in this mode you can choose between P, A, S, and M then each thing has different numbers you can play with. Well was reading on here the other night and something clicked... Aperture, Shutter speed, and Manual (cant remember what the P is). Anway, I figured out that on "A" you set the aperture and it automatically does the shutter speed, white balance, and ISO speed. "S" is the same for shutter speed. If I remember right, "P" did the same for ISO speed. Then on "M" you can play with it all. I played around with it in my room the other day, but got frustrated as I couldnt get it to do what I want. Is going manual on my point and shoot going to be the same as on a film SLR or a digital SLR? Any info on this would greatly help, thanks guys.
     
  2. MikeR

    MikeR TPF Noob!

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    There will be differences between a P&S and a DSLR because of the
    sensor size and lens, The DOF (depth of field) will be different at the same aperture. But you can still learn and take great shots with a P&S.
    Here are some basic "guidelines" as to when to use each mode while you are learning:
    If your goal is to either blur or freeze motion, use the Shutter Priority mode.
    If you goal is to isolate a subject from the background, This would be a shallow DOF, the use the Aperture priority mode. Same if you want to have great DOF. Remember that a lower number (f/2.8) will have much less DOF than a high number (F/16).
    If you are taking a shot in low light,use the aperture priority mode, You may need to use a tripod due to the camera selecting a slow shutter speed.

    This was meant to only be a brief rundown to get you started. There is much more to learn and consider,including ISO and lighting.
     
  3. StreetShark

    StreetShark TPF Noob!

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    For ISO it is best to stick to a low one. higher ISO's wil create more grain and noise. Only use high ISO for dark places such as concerts. Thats all I can really tell you that hasn't already been said as I am also new to photography. I shoot a Kodak Z650 and use PASM alot.
     
  4. gmarquez

    gmarquez TPF Noob!

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    "Is going manual on my point and shoot going to be the same as on a film SLR or a digital SLR?"

    Pretty much, yes.

    "got frustrated as I couldnt get it to do what I want."

    Here you go!

    The Basic Daylight Exposure Guide (BDE, in Adobe PDF format):
    http://tinyurl.com/3764fy


    Another description on "the rule of 16" (From Top Ten Tips From Professional Photographers):
    http://www.dalelabs.com/didukno2.html

    "The Rule of 16 - Here's a good way to check your camera's meter for accuracy...or make a reasonable guess of exposure in case of battery failure. The correct exposure for a normal sunlit day will be f/16 with the shutter speed being approximately equal to the ISO of the film. For ISO 100 film, for example, the correct setting for average, open sunlight would be f/16 at 1/125th of a second. For ISO 400 film, you would use f/16 at 1/500th of a second. On the beach, where you have reflected light, you should close down one stop (or increase the shutter speed). On a cloudy day, open up a stop or two."
     
  5. Thor06

    Thor06 TPF Noob!

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    Ah yes, great info thanks guys! I think I will just go out some day dink around with it for a while. Glad to hear that its pretty much the same going manual in P&S and SLR cameras, I think this way I can mess around and get that down and see if I like it before investing in an expensive piece of equipment (remember I am a college kid, anything over $10 is expensive to me :p).

    Anyone else?
     

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