UV Filter??

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by realitycheck3907, Sep 19, 2008.

  1. realitycheck3907

    realitycheck3907 TPF Noob!

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    Hey guys I have a question what does a UV Filter actually do? I have them on my lenses now and have had them on there for a long time. I thought they were just clear lenses to cover and protect my lenses when I bought them several years ago. I just realized the other day though they are actually UV Filters. Thanks for the help.
     
  2. reg

    reg TPF Noob!

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    Well, almost all DSLRs have a UV filter built in. It has no effect, but some use it to protect the front lens element. I prefer to keep my lens hood on and not use a UV filter, but I mostly bump into stuff. If you got a lot of smudges or scratches on your lens, then a UV might be attractive. Just remember that a cheap filter will degrade image quality, sometimes significantly.
     
  3. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    If you want to make cleaning the front element of your lenses easy, which as Reg said, is about the only thing a UV filter is good for on DSLRs, then buy clear glass "filters" they'll cost you just as much as regular filters, but they do make life easier and have no discernable effect on image quality.
     
  4. TamiyaGuy

    TamiyaGuy No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Basically, a UV filter can cut down on the "haze" you see in long-distance landscape photographs (a circular polarizing filter can do the same thing, but it soaks up a stop of light). However, most people just use a UV filter as general protection for their lens. It's much cheaper to replace a £20 filter than it is to replace a £250 lens!
     
  5. realitycheck3907

    realitycheck3907 TPF Noob!

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    Well the one on my 55mm says CPC Phase 2 UV japan. My 58mm says Quantaray UV, all of this is on the side of the filters. So would it just be better to take them off for now? Obviously I want my image quality to be the best it can be, and so far I havent really had a problem with bumping in many things.
     
  6. kundalini

    kundalini Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Do a side-by-side comparison with and without the filter on....in varying light conditions. See if you can tell the difference at 100%. Post the results if it's interesting.

    Murphy's Law now applies. :lol:
     
  7. beaminge36

    beaminge36 TPF Noob!

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    Im going to shoot at the park today and I'll take a few with and without the UV filter. Its currently nice and bright outside so if it does anything, now should be the case. I have a tiffen haze-1 filter on a 50mm f/1.4 lens. I'll post results later today as this is something i've been curious about myself.

    Nick
     
  8. cnvang

    cnvang TPF Noob!

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    Copied this from bhphotovideo.com:

    "Haze (UV) filters are wise initial investments. They help protect your valuable investment from dust, moisture and scratches, which can lead to costly repairs. If desired they can be left on the lens at all times for protection. Haze filters provide additional benefits of correction for Ultraviolet (UV) light, which can register on film and videotape as a bluish cast and can obscure distant details. Ultraviolet filters allow you to correct the UV effect to varying degrees. The UV-Haze filter is helpful when photographing mountain and marine scenes, where increased haze threatens to make your photographs indistinct in color and clarity. Multicoated to minimize reflection at the filter surfaces which reduces flare and ghosting."
     
  9. manaheim

    manaheim Jedi Bunnywabbit Staff Member Supporting Member

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    A buddy of mine has also found that UV filters are invaluable when taking pictures of fish tanks, since a lot of fish tanks have a LOT of UV light. (speaking primarily of marine tanks)
     

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