A scientist captured an impossible photo of a single atom

Discussion in 'Articles of Interest' started by RowdyRay, Feb 13, 2018.

  1. RowdyRay

    RowdyRay No longer a newbie, moving up!

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  2. Nintendoeats

    Nintendoeats TPF Noob!

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    That is extremely cool, and I agree that it is a very useful way to visualize this scale. It's a shame that it doesn't contain anything relatable for context.
     
  3. pixmedic

    pixmedic The Mustached Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    not enough DOF
     
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  4. 480sparky

    480sparky Chief Free Electron Relocator Supporting Member

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    Pfffft. I can do the same thing. But with just my cell phone.

    And with 147ee527 atoms!


    [​IMG]
     
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  5. vin88

    vin88 TPF Noob!

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    it had been done in the 50's with an electron microscope, but nice pix..
     
  6. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    Pretty cool.

    The single atom itself is way, way, way smaller than the glow of light in the image.
    I wonder how long the "long exposure" was.
     
  7. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Ehhh... if he captured it, it's not impossible. If it's impossible, he didn't capture it.
     
  8. jaomul

    jaomul Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Reckon a Sony sensors camera would have given it more dynamic range
    :band:
     
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  9. Gary A.

    Gary A. Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    You running a wide angle attachment on your cell phone?
     
  10. Gary A.

    Gary A. Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    So an atom has wires, screws, nuts and a tube ...?
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2018
  11. weepete

    weepete TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    I believe the title of the image is "Single atom in ion trap"

    Very cool anyway.
     
  12. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Looking at this, it's not making sense. An atom is between 1/10 and 1/2 a nanometer in diameter (approximately). Based on the text of the article, the distance between the electrode and the "atom" is ~1mm, which by my estimation makes the atom about 1/50 - 1/100 of a mm in diameter. So... how does 0.01 - 0.000000001??????
     

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