American dipper (AKA water ouzel)

squirl033

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these little guys can be a challenge... they bounce around a lot, and they tend to hang out in shady places along rivers and streams, which makes for difficult photo conditions. but with a bit of luck, a lot of patience, and a fill flash, i was able to get some shots. here are a couple...



 

LarryLomona

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great bird and color coordinated too!
 

BillM

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Nice shots, never even heard of them.
 

Derrel

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These little birds are fairly common along the rivers of the Pacific Northwest, and are seen pretty often during this time of year, during winter steelhead fishing trips and such. They literally go under the surface of the rivers here, and forage! They're really cute little birds too. There are not especially large. From Wikipedia, a partial entry:

"The American dipper (Cinclus mexicanus), also known as a water ouzel, is a stocky dark grey bird with a head sometimes tinged with brown, and white feathers on the eyelids that cause the eyes to flash white as the bird blinks. It is 16.5 cm long and weighs on average 46 g. It has long legs, and bobs its whole body up and down during pauses as it feeds on the bottom of fast-moving, rocky streams. It inhabits the mountainous regions of Central America and western North America from Panama to Alaska.

This species, like other dippers, is equipped with an extra eyelid called a "nictitating membrane" that allows it to see underwater, and scales that close its nostrils when submerged. Dippers also produce more oil than most birds, which may help keep them warmer when seeking food underwater."
 
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squirl033

squirl033

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great bird and color coordinated too!

thanks, Larry!

Nice captures.

thank you, Hunter!

Very good
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thanks, Nasserah!

Nice shots, never even heard of them.

thanks, Bill... they're considered "uncommon" throughout their range, and aren't found at all east of the Rockies, so it's not surprising you haven't heard of them... ;)

Really nice!

thanks, Brian!

Nice shots, never even heard of them.
never heard of that bird !

thank you, Beagle... if you're east of the Great Plains, you'll likely never see one... they're only found between the Pacific coast and the eastern slope of the Rockies ...

These little birds are fairly common along the rivers of the Pacific Northwest, and are seen pretty often during this time of year, during winter steelhead fishing trips and such. They literally go under the surface of the rivers here, and forage! They're really cute little birds too. There are not especially large.

thanks, Derrel... you're right, they're not large... a bit bigger than a sparrow, but smaller than a robin. they can be elusive, and are tough to get good shots of because they bounce around so much, and are usually found in shady areas along river banks...
 

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