Bicycle Camera Bags

Gromit801

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We've been wanting to take some equipment with us when we go cycling, and don't really want to wear backpacks while we ride. Alters the center of gravity too much. Most bike bags we've seen for cameras seem to be handlebar bags. I can see the usefulness with these, but one sticking point is we'd have to remove our lights, and also the feeling of extra weight on the bars when we turn them. Does anyone know of a good set of camera panniers or trunk bag for camera equipment?
 
Wow, nothing?
 
I don't know of a bike bag specifically for camera equipment, but I DO know of a really sweet trunk bag you might want to check out. It's the Arkel Trailrider. I use one on my bike to carry my spare kit, lock, phone, snacks... And I've used it for my camera as well. You won't be able to fit your whole kit in it, but it'll definitely handle a couple of lenses with room for accessories. I'm able to fit my 7D and 70-200 2.8 with no problem. There's also a padded velcro divider that can be positioned anywhere inside the bag. And it has a little pullout rain cover, though I 'm not sure if I'd trust it to protect electronics. Hope this helps!
 
Good thing I shoot film! I'll look into it. I've also sent notes to Tamrac and Lowepro asking WTF?
 
I would consider regular panniers and add a camera insert partition to one or both.
 
How much equipment do you take with you and how long of rides? Why don't regular panniers work for you?

Instead of backpacks, have you thought about messenger bags? Or do you want absolutely nothing on your back?

No offense, but I can't imagine there is a huge market for panniers specifically designed for camera equipment...
 
I have a trunk bag on a rear rack.
But it begs the question what type of terrain you are riding over. Some terrain can really jerk equipment around even if in camera type bags. You'd have to add bubblewrap and other padding to try and prevent so much sudden movement, all dependent upon terrain.

My (really old) trunk bag is big enough for a DSLR and my 80-200/2.8 lens and room for 2 more smaller lenses.
 
How much equipment do you take with you and how long of rides? Why don't regular panniers work for you?

Instead of backpacks, have you thought about messenger bags? Or do you want absolutely nothing on your back?

No offense, but I can't imagine there is a huge market for panniers specifically designed for camera equipment...

I think there's as much a market for pannier camera bags, as there is for photo vests or photo backpacks for camping.

I prefer not to have anything hanging off of me while cycling, and I know a lot of other cyclists who feel the same way.

Regular panniers aren't padded much, if at all. One does fall down now and then so a well padded, even hard case pannier would be useful.
 
How much equipment do you take with you and how long of rides? Why don't regular panniers work for you?

Instead of backpacks, have you thought about messenger bags? Or do you want absolutely nothing on your back?

No offense, but I can't imagine there is a huge market for panniers specifically designed for camera equipment...

I think there's as much a market for pannier camera bags, as there is for photo vests or photo backpacks for camping.

I prefer not to have anything hanging off of me while cycling, and I know a lot of other cyclists who feel the same way.

Regular panniers aren't padded much, if at all. One does fall down now and then so a well padded, even hard case pannier would be useful.
I understand your need. That said, I've seen more walking photographers than biking photographers, so there's more of a need for vests than specific panniers.

How much equipment do you anticipate taking with you? If you're planning on falling, get insurance on your equipment. That way, if you fall or it gets stolen, you're covered. Then, all you have to worry about is getting to the hospital if you break something.
 

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