Buying my first camera. Should I get used one??

kahnbiraj

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Hi! This is my first post in the forum. Thank you creators.
So! I want to buy my first SLR camera. I want to buy something I can grow with. So I am looking for something better than beginner cameras, something that wont limit me as I get better, well, at least for a while. I have used D5300 D3300 600D and 700D. I have not used any other cameras. I for sure am not a fan of Nikon. Did not like it much. I would prefer something from Canon.
I plan on shooting short films. So something good at taking videos would be nice. I have been watching reviews and reading about EOS 60D. Seems good too. Since I dont know much about it, can anyone suggest me what I should do? How should I choose the camera? Is there any camera you would like me to take a look at?
AND, I found this kit in ebay. $600 for used one. I am in Nepal. So returning the set if I do not like it will not be possible. Can anyone tell me about used cameras? since I am not too familiar?


https://www.amazon.com/Canon-EOS-60...qid=1477965532&sr=1-13&keywords=canon+eos+60d
 

photo1x1.com

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Hi there,
I'm a Canon DSLR and Sony mirrorless shooter. Mirrorless cameras use a very similar technique to DSLRs. Only instead of a mirror that lets you look through the lens, they read out the sensor and show you a digital version instead. Both in the viewfinder and in the monitor.
If it comes to video, Sony is way ahead the competition in my opinion, especially when it comes to autofocus. Sonys a6000 focus is very accurate, smooth and lets you set several video-related focus options.
The best beginner option from Sony is the a6000. Amazing value for money, takes 11 images per second and offers great image quality (depending on the lens you use of corse)
However, to every system there are pros an cons:
pro mirrorless:
  1. smaller and lighter (better for travelling - hiking in Nepal)?
  2. smaller (people don't stare at you that much when you take pictures)
  3. the digital viewfinder: you see what you get, PLUS: you can review your images (and videos!!!) in the viewfinder, great when you are out in bright sunlight (snow and sun in Nepal will make your monitor pretty useless unless you cover it with something.
  4. Innovating - especially Sony is currently leading the market in regard to innovation. Since you are investing into a system rather than into a camera, that is a big + for me.
  5. Video recording: both 60d and a6000 offer full HD. Sony has the better video quality, no doubt.
con mirrorless:
  1. battery life. Batteries are small because the camera is small, plus you need more battery power for operating due to the electronic viewfinder. To me that is a non-issue though because since the batteries are small, I carry quite a few with me. You need to consider the costs though.
  2. Lens choice: The system is still comparatively new and while many manufacturers are currently comming on board, realizing the potential, the amount of lenses you can get is comparatively limited, especially on the used market. And lenses are more expensive. That isn't so much an issue when starting out, because there is usually a kit lens included. And since Sony and their great partner Zeiss are continuously releasing lenses, the market for NEW lens options is growing fast.
  3. The viewfinder: most often pro, can be a con too if you are used to DSLR work. Especially in Studio, when working with studio flash, doing portraits, etc. it is something you need to get used to.
  4. Accessories. just like with lens choice, every rather new system offers less accessory options, but most things are available.
  5. Sensor dust. The missing mirror exposes your sensor when you change lenses. That way it is more likely that you get the one or the other dust particle on your sensor and need to clean more often thatn with DSLR.
Other things to consider: do you need an external microphone input for your videos? In camera mics are rather bad, so to get better sound quality, most people use externals. Not all cameras have an input. The a6000 doesn't have one, tbe 60D does. You can record audio externally and synch in post production, which sometimes is the preferred method of fi,mmakers anyway.

Buying a used camera is always kind of tricky if you can't check it first. If you consider that, make sure you check the number of shutter actuations. The more the worse, because every shutter has some kind of lifecycle.

That's it for now: to be more specific, maybe you can give us an idea of your preferred photography areas. What is it that you want to shoot?
 
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kahnbiraj

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Hi there,
I'm a Canon DSLR and Sony mirrorless shooter. Mirrorless cameras use a very similar technique to DSLRs. Only instead of a mirror that lets you look through the lens, they read out the sensor and show you a digital version instead. Both in the viewfinder and in the monitor.
If it comes to video, Sony is way ahead the competition in my opinion, especially when it comes to autofocus. Sonys a6000 focus is very accurate, smooth and lets you set several video-related focus options.
The best beginner option from Sony is the a6000. Amazing value for money, takes 11 images per second and offers great image quality (depending on the lens you use of corse)
However, to every system there are pros an cons:
pro mirrorless:
  1. smaller and lighter (better for travelling - hiking in Nepal)?
  2. smaller (people don't stare at you that much when you take pictures)
  3. the digital viewfinder: you see what you get, PLUS: you can review your images (and videos!!!) in the viewfinder, great when you are out in bright sunlight (snow and sun in Nepal will make your monitor pretty useless unless you cover it with something.
  4. Innovating - especially Sony is currently leading the market in regard to innovation. Since you are investing into a system rather than into a camera, that is a big + for me.
  5. Video recording: both 60d and a6000 offer full HD. Sony has the better video quality, no doubt.
con mirrorless:
  1. battery life. Batteries are small because the camera is small, plus you need more battery power for operating due to the electronic viewfinder. To me that is a non-issue though because since the batteries are small, I carry quite a few with me. You need to consider the costs though.
  2. Lens choice: The system is still comparatively new and while many manufacturers are currently comming on board, realizing the potential, the amount of lenses you can get is comparatively limited, especially on the used market. And lenses are more expensive. That isn't so much an issue when starting out, because there is usually a kit lens included. And since Sony and their great partner Zeiss are continuously releasing lenses, the market for NEW lens options is growing fast.
  3. The viewfinder: most often pro, can be a con too if you are used to DSLR work. Especially in Studio, when working with studio flash, doing portraits, etc. it is something you need to get used to.
  4. Accessories. just like with lens choice, every rather new system offers less accessory options, but most things are available.
Other things to consider: do you need an external microphone input for your videos? In camera mics are rather bad, so to get better sound quality, most people use externals. Not all cameras have an input. The a6000 doesn't have one, tbe 60D does. You can record audio externally and synch in post production, which sometimes is the preferred method of fi,mmakers anyway.

Buying a used camera is always kind of tricky if you can't check it first. If you consider that, make sure you check the number of shutter actuations. The more the worse, because every shutter has some kind of lifecycle.

That's it for now: to be more specific, maybe you can give us an idea of your preferred photography areas. What is it that you want to shoot?

Thanks a lot for the reply. I did read about mirrorless too. But I am not quite sure of it. If I go for the A6000, I'll have to buy a bundle of accessories right now for I cant be sure of when they will arrive here in Nepal. I just watched a video from techmafia where he explains using a Nikon F1.4 50mm with the A6000. The whole accessory bundle will cost me around $750 (since I have to get an audio recorder too).
Since I am not any pro, there is no specific work I'll be doing with it. I want to use it to take portraits while I am in town as some landscapes when I am out travelling. And yes, I will shoot videos when I go hiking.
Most importantly, do you think it is a good choice to learn photography?
 

photo1x1.com

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Hi there,
I'm a Canon DSLR and Sony mirrorless shooter. Mirrorless cameras use a very similar technique to DSLRs. Only instead of a mirror that lets you look through the lens, they read out the sensor and show you a digital version instead. Both in the viewfinder and in the monitor.
If it comes to video, Sony is way ahead the competition in my opinion, especially when it comes to autofocus. Sonys a6000 focus is very accurate, smooth and lets you set several video-related focus options.
The best beginner option from Sony is the a6000. Amazing value for money, takes 11 images per second and offers great image quality (depending on the lens you use of corse)
However, to every system there are pros an cons:
pro mirrorless:
  1. smaller and lighter (better for travelling - hiking in Nepal)?
  2. smaller (people don't stare at you that much when you take pictures)
  3. the digital viewfinder: you see what you get, PLUS: you can review your images (and videos!!!) in the viewfinder, great when you are out in bright sunlight (snow and sun in Nepal will make your monitor pretty useless unless you cover it with something.
  4. Innovating - especially Sony is currently leading the market in regard to innovation. Since you are investing into a system rather than into a camera, that is a big + for me.
  5. Video recording: both 60d and a6000 offer full HD. Sony has the better video quality, no doubt.
con mirrorless:
  1. battery life. Batteries are small because the camera is small, plus you need more battery power for operating due to the electronic viewfinder. To me that is a non-issue though because since the batteries are small, I carry quite a few with me. You need to consider the costs though.
  2. Lens choice: The system is still comparatively new and while many manufacturers are currently comming on board, realizing the potential, the amount of lenses you can get is comparatively limited, especially on the used market. And lenses are more expensive. That isn't so much an issue when starting out, because there is usually a kit lens included. And since Sony and their great partner Zeiss are continuously releasing lenses, the market for NEW lens options is growing fast.
  3. The viewfinder: most often pro, can be a con too if you are used to DSLR work. Especially in Studio, when working with studio flash, doing portraits, etc. it is something you need to get used to.
  4. Accessories. just like with lens choice, every rather new system offers less accessory options, but most things are available.
Other things to consider: do you need an external microphone input for your videos? In camera mics are rather bad, so to get better sound quality, most people use externals. Not all cameras have an input. The a6000 doesn't have one, tbe 60D does. You can record audio externally and synch in post production, which sometimes is the preferred method of fi,mmakers anyway.

Buying a used camera is always kind of tricky if you can't check it first. If you consider that, make sure you check the number of shutter actuations. The more the worse, because every shutter has some kind of lifecycle.

That's it for now: to be more specific, maybe you can give us an idea of your preferred photography areas. What is it that you want to shoot?

Thanks a lot for the reply. I did read about mirrorless too. But I am not quite sure of it. If I go for the A6000, I'll have to buy a bundle of accessories right now for I cant be sure of when they will arrive here in Nepal. I just watched a video from techmafia where he explains using a Nikon F1.4 50mm with the A6000. The whole accessory bundle will cost me around $750 (since I have to get an audio recorder too).
Since I am not any pro, there is no specific work I'll be doing with it. I want to use it to take portraits while I am in town as some landscapes when I am out travelling. And yes, I will shoot videos when I go hiking.
Most importantly, do you think it is a good choice to learn photography?

You are welcome ;).
If you want to use lenses like the F1.4 50mm with this camera, it does take some accessories. But you could also use native lenses, like the sony 50mm f1.8 (SEL50F18 - black or silver) instead, and have a great video-focussing modern portrait lens.
I recommended this camera to three people that bought it (my father in law who is a hobby photographer who came from Nikon D90), a friend (who is an enthusiast that came from an iPhone), and a professional youtuber who didn´t have much to do with photo/video and used a DSLR before. All three are very, very happy. So while I don´t think they would have been unhappy with the 60D, the a6000 in my opinion is much more value for the money. Some will disagree, others concur. Mirrorless or not has become the new Canon-Nikon battle (just kidding). But yes, I really think it is a good choice when learning photography.
One thing I´ll add to the list above right now is sensor dust. Mirrorless cameras don´t have mirrors and so the sensor is exposed to the environment when you change lenses, and gather the one or the other dust particle. If you take care and don´t work in a windy, and very dusty area (like I did recently on a many building plots), you can avoid those problems. But it is much more likely to have to clean your sensor (having it cleaned in Nepal might not be too easy?), I recomment arctic butterfly for that purpose. Not cheap at all, but awesome.
Sooner or later any camera DSLR or mirrorless will catch dust (of course, only if you change lenses). Some care, others don´t. But with mirrorless you definitely have to clean more often.
To sum it up: for travelling (lightweight, small and digital viewfinder), portrait in town (less noticeable) and videoquality (focus and better codec): all three of your listed uses are pro a6000 in my opinion. The only con being external audio, that would be easier with the 60D.
 

goodguy

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So if you like Canon and want to do video then get the Canon 70D, its got an excellent auto focus system for video.
No problem getting it used but be sure to check it well before you buy.

wouldn't recommend the 60D, it doesn't have a good auto focus video and doesn't have the touch screen.
 

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