crop duster plane

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by stevet1, Aug 15, 2019.

  1. stevet1

    stevet1 TPF Noob!

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    I tried to shoot a crop duster plane just about going overhead.
    It was a bright sunny day, so I think I had the aperture set about right.
    Thinking I would try and freeze frame the plane with no blur, I had the speed set to 3400th, but the ISO was set to 100.
    My pictures came out virtually black.
    Was my speed set too high, or my ISO too low?

    Steve Thomas


     
  2. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    What was the aperture? Based on an ISO of 100, an aperture of f16-22 and SS of 1/125 - 200 or variation thereof would have been about right.
     
  3. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Aperture was not specified.

    Exposure is determined by the aperture and shutter speed (time of opening).

    Were you panning with the plane?

    With an astonishing 1/3400 of a second shutter speed, I don't know how any average lens could get a large enough aperture to get a decent exposure.
     
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  4. stevet1

    stevet1 TPF Noob!

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    Not sure of the aperture. I'm trying to use Canon FD lenses on an EF mount with an adapter that doesn't give feedback to the camera on what the aperture setting is. I have to guess.
    Would have my aperture setting have been too low or too high?
    Yes, I was panning - only had one or two seconds to try and grab the shot because of intervening trees.
    Would a speed of about 1000th or even 200th have frozen the plane in flight?
    I'm thinking 1/3400th was way, way too high.

    Steve Thomas
     
  5. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Aviation Photography
     
  6. RVT1K

    RVT1K No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    And the ISO.
     
  7. RVT1K

    RVT1K No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Freezing the plane in flight is more about panning with it. I have lots of shots of motorcycle racing and drag racing that were taken at 1/500 sec. The subject is sharp because I was panning with it and the background is blurred by the motion.

    The exposure depends on three things...aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. A proper exposure can be achieved with lots of different combinations of the three. The ones you choose to use, ultimately are determined by what you want your shot to look like.
     
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  8. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I dispute that.
     
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  9. Dacaur

    Dacaur TPF Noob!

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    Dispute all you want, but it's a fact, not an opinion....

    For prop planes, 1/125 works well if you are good at panning, 1/250 gives you more of a margin (higher likleyhood of getting the plane in focus), but the prop blur won't look as good.
     
  10. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    In case you missed it, I was the one who posted the link to Aviation Photography. (see post #5, above)

    What I dispute is that ISO has anything to do with exposure. In digital technology, the ISO value is applied gain, which is considerably different than film sensitivity.

    Your turn.
     
  11. RVT1K

    RVT1K No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    From the manual of my D4...


    “ISO sensitivity” is the digital equivalent of film speed. Choose
    from settings that range from ISO 100 and ISO 12800 in steps
    equivalent to 1/3 EV. Settings of from about 0.3 to 1 EV below ISO
    100 and 0.3 to 4 EV above ISO 12800 are also available for special
    situations. The higher the ISO sensitivity, the less light needed to
    make an exposure, allowing higher shutter speeds or smaller
    apertures.
     
  12. stevet1

    stevet1 TPF Noob!

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    [QUOTE

    Aviation Photography[/QUOTE]

    Designer,

    Thank you. That was very helpful.

    Steve Thomas
     

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