Developing B&W film

bdpaco

TPF Noob!
Joined
Jan 14, 2011
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Location
Indiana
Can others edit my Photos
Photos OK to edit
I am mainly a digital photographer, but I picked up a 35mm film camera and want to start developing my own b&w film and do my own prints. I have been reading up on a lot of different sites and a couple books, but I am confused as to what chemicals I need since they all suggest something different. I plan on using Ilford Delta 100 and 400 b&w film.
Can any of you suggest a simple list of chemicals I can start with while I learn how to develop and print. Thanks for your help.
 

Freelancephotog25

TPF Noob!
Joined
Sep 9, 2010
Messages
19
Reaction score
0
Location
Western NY
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
kodak d-76is a good film developer that works with most types of B+W film, water can be used as a stop bath and a final rinse for the film. Anything you buy will have directions on how long to put the film and paper in each solution. The basic sequence is developer, stop bath (can just be a water rinse) fixer a rinse, hypoclearing agent (can be replaced with 30 min of continuous rinsing, another quick rinse and photo flow, which is optional. The paper uses dektol as your developer a stop bath (again can be water) and then the same fix you use for your film, then a rinse. Rinse times depend on the type of paper you buy and will be listed with the paper. Hope this helps. the fixer is just Kodak Fixer for B+W
 

ann

No longer a newbie, moving up!
Joined
May 14, 2007
Messages
4,263
Reaction score
189
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
check out Ilford"s website for some great pdf files on step by step developing along with a specific list of items necessary for developing your film. It really is easy .

Modern films donot need hypoclearning agent, or 30 minutes of washing, check Ilford's washing method, saves water , and doesn't take much time.

Not using stopbath with paper is going to reduce the number of prints the fixer can properly work on. Besides stopbath is very cheap,
 
OP
B

bdpaco

TPF Noob!
Joined
Jan 14, 2011
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Location
Indiana
Can others edit my Photos
Photos OK to edit
Thanks everyone, seems there is a little more to it than I expected. But I am excited to see what I can do in a dark room.
 

ann

No longer a newbie, moving up!
Joined
May 14, 2007
Messages
4,263
Reaction score
189
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
To develop negatives is really very easy. you must load the film on the tank in the dark, but from then forward, everything can be done in the light.

Learning to print takes more equipment and has a longer learning curve, but you could scan the negatives and work with them in an editing program.
 

djacobox372

No longer a newbie, moving up!
Joined
May 4, 2008
Messages
2,925
Reaction score
129
Location
Seattle, WA
Website
djacob372.deviantart.com
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
here's a shopping list that I would recommend for at-home developing:

1)Kodak HC-110 developer Kodak HC110 Film Developer Concentrate to make 2 Gallons | Freestyle Photographic Supplies

2)Kodafix Kodak Kodafix to Make 1 Gallon | Freestyle Photographic Supplies

3)Two Reel Developing Tank: Arista Premium Double Reel Developing Tank with two reels | Freestyle Photographic Supplies

4) Kodak Photo-flo: Kodak Photo Flo 200 16 oz. | Freestyle Photographic Supplies

5) 1000ml graduated cylinder: Arista Graduated Cylinder 1000ml | Freestyle Photographic Supplies

6) 50ml graduated cylinder (for measuring small quantities of developer): Arista Graduated Cylinder 50ml | Freestyle Photographic Supplies

7) changing bag: Arista Changing Bag 27 in. x 30 in. | Freestyle Photographic Supplies

8) One quart container to store reusable fix: Delta Datatainer 1 QT (32OZ) | Freestyle Photographic Supplies

10) clips for hanging drying photos.

11) Timer of some sort

12) Thermometer

Total cost: around $80 + shipping

One bottle of HC-110 is good for around 40 rolls using 1:31 dilution. The bottle of Fix will last even longer, as it can be reused many times. Chemical costs end up being less then 50 cents or less a roll.

You could also by kodak stop, but I just use tapwater.

I'd recommend doing the last wash of the negatives in distilled water with a few ML of photo-flo so your negatives dry clean and streak free.
 

djacobox372

No longer a newbie, moving up!
Joined
May 4, 2008
Messages
2,925
Reaction score
129
Location
Seattle, WA
Website
djacob372.deviantart.com
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
kodak d-76is a good film developer that works with most types of B+W film, water can be used as a stop bath and a final rinse for the film. Anything you buy will have directions on how long to put the film and paper in each solution. The basic sequence is developer, stop bath (can just be a water rinse) fixer a rinse, hypoclearing agent (can be replaced with 30 min of continuous rinsing, another quick rinse and photo flow, which is optional. The paper uses dektol as your developer a stop bath (again can be water) and then the same fix you use for your film, then a rinse. Rinse times depend on the type of paper you buy and will be listed with the paper. Hope this helps. the fixer is just Kodak Fixer for B+W

I would recommend against any powered chemicals like D-76 developer. Powdered chemicals require you to mix up the working solution in large batches which have limited shelf life.

Instead use liquid developer like HC-110 (very similar to d-76), that way you can mix up only as much as you're using at one time. The concentrate will last for years on the shelf.
 

ann

No longer a newbie, moving up!
Joined
May 14, 2007
Messages
4,263
Reaction score
189
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
If you decide to use HC110 (which i would also recommend) use it as a one shot developer, don't mix the whole concentrate at one time, unless your doing huge batches of film at a time. Think 50-60 rolls at once.
 

djacobox372

No longer a newbie, moving up!
Joined
May 4, 2008
Messages
2,925
Reaction score
129
Location
Seattle, WA
Website
djacob372.deviantart.com
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
If you decide to use HC110 (which i would also recommend) use it as a one shot developer, don't mix the whole concentrate at one time, unless your doing huge batches of film at a time. Think 50-60 rolls at once.

Exactly! that's the advantage of liquid developer. Using a syringe to measure the small amounts of developer makes it easier.
 

Cheri

TPF Noob!
Joined
Jan 26, 2011
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Location
England
Can others edit my Photos
Photos OK to edit
Don't sweat it.
I'm 18 and a bit dim sometimes, and I can manage it. I'm sure you'll be totally fine. Just take your time and maybe shoot a test film if you're unsure?
As in, shoot a roll of film that you wouldn't be too bummed out by losing if it went wrong.
And if it works out, you know you've done it right.

I'm probably no help at all, sorry. haha
 

Most reactions

New Topics

Top