Developing C-41 Color Film w/ D-76 B&W Chemicals

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by iKokomo, Jan 11, 2018.

  1. iKokomo

    iKokomo TPF Noob!

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    I have never developed film before and I have read that it is best to start off with black and white developing because it is easier than color.

    I just bought a large lot of vintage film cameras (over 50 cameras) to clean and sell and there are a lot of half-used rolls of film in them that I will finish using and I want to learn how to develop them. In the lot, there were developing tanks, thermometers and the like.

    My question is they are all color C-41 film.
    Can I use my D-76 B&W Chemicals that I just got to cross-prosses and develop these?

    If yes, are there any specific instructions or issues that I need to be aware of that may be different from developing black and white film?

    Also, for people that have done this for years, any tips and tricks you would like to pass along?

    This would be my first roll of film ever self-developed and I am excited!! :)

    Thanks for your help!


     
  2. 480sparky

    480sparky Chief Free Electron Relocator Supporting Member

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    I think you'll end up with blank film.
     
  3. Fred von den Berg

    Fred von den Berg No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I tried BW400CN film (a film that is C-41) in black and white developer and it came out blank.
     
  4. compur

    compur Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    It makes me cringe to think of a newby starting out this way but yes, you can do that.

    Google your question and see lots of info on it.
     
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  5. smithdan

    smithdan No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Good advice from Compur. I have processed lots of C41 in D76 with fair to good results. Had a bunch of expired color film so used it to test drive my junk store finds for light leaks and the like so as not to waste pricey BW stock. 8 to 10 min at 20c for D76 stock worked ok. Looks cloudy at first but dries clearer. Scans enough to adjust to a decent image in post.
     
  6. webestang64

    webestang64 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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  7. limr

    limr Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Yes, you can do that. They will come out as black and white images. They may be be grainy and low contrast if the film is expired (depending on how expired it is).

    In general, there's really no good reason to do this as standard practice, but I've done this when I just want to test a camera or do a little experimenting with a new technique, and it's fine. As was said, it's good if you don't want to burn through your better B&W stock.

    As some examples, here are a few images from a roll of expired Gold 200, developed in Caffenol (a homemade developer made of instant coffee, washing soda, and Vitamin C powder) shot with a K1000 that I was testing:

    [​IMG]
    Reading
    by limrodrigues, on Flickr

    [​IMG]
    Silk
    by limrodrigues, on Flickr

    [​IMG]
    Winter afternoon
    by limrodrigues, on Flickr
     
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  8. Fred von den Berg

    Fred von den Berg No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    @limr :could you post a recipe for the Caffenol?
     
  9. Fred von den Berg

    Fred von den Berg No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Maybe it was the BW400CN that was not suitable, or perhaps I just got my mix/temp/times wrong. Anyway, I have some expired Gold 200 and will be trying again at some point. Very glad @iKokomo posted this question.
     
  10. 480sparky

    480sparky Chief Free Electron Relocator Supporting Member

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    To make 1l:
    100ml washing soda
    16ml ascorbic acid
    160ml coffee
    Add water to make 1l


    To make 400ml:
    40ml washing soda
    7ml ascorbic acid
    64ml coffee
    Add water to make 400ml.

    Washing soda can be found in the cleaning/laundry aisle. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) at a health food store (do not buy flavored type).
     
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  11. Fred von den Berg

    Fred von den Berg No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Thanks, Ken. I'll give this a go. How is it used re temps/times/mix?
     
  12. limr

    limr Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I have found this resource very useful: Caffenol Recipes, Help, Tutorials | The Caffenol Cookbook & Bible

    Reinhold is a Caffenol guru and runs this blog: Caffenol - and here are all the posts with recipes: Caffenol: recipe

    He and one of the other authors of the Cookbook have slightly different recipes, which is the difference between the, for example, C-M and the C-M (RS) recipe. I follow the RS recipes.
     
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