Do I need a DSLR?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by jsearing, Jan 25, 2008.

  1. photogincollege

    photogincollege TPF Noob!

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    Well most nikons come with an 18-55 lens, but I suggest getting body only and maybe looking at the 18-70. I got a great deal on a very very gently used on on ebay for 139 with shipping. Its a step up from the 18-55 that you can find for a really good price.


     
  2. trapspeed

    trapspeed TPF Noob!

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    I, too, made the same mistake. I didn't know much about cameras but always loved photography. I went out and bought a Sony S2 IS powershot. Soon enough I felt the camera was holding me back and I needed to get a DSLR to really get serious about learning exposure.

    I bought a Rebel XT about a week ago and am very satisfied with the upgrade.

    IMO, I think you should return it.
     
  3. Tennessee Landscape

    Tennessee Landscape TPF Noob!

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    What I did was kepp my prosumer, ( which is what I believe your Sony is ) and learned how to operate the manual controls. I took lots of pictures forcing myself to use manual settings, what you learn will transfer over to a DSLR Nikon or Canon. That is what I did. Started with a Kodak ZD710, and when I bought my Nikon D80, even though there is a big step up in ability and features, it was not as daunting a task to learn. I would take your time with it. IMHO, you will be better in the end.......
     
  4. Jon0807

    Jon0807 TPF Noob!

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    I would also suggest going to a store and holding the camera's you're trying to decide on in your hands and playing with them for a while. Before I got my Canon I was leaning twords Nikon but after playing with both, I realized that I liked the way the canon felt alot better. Also the placement of the controls and features were more to my liking.

    Another thing to consider is that most of your money will be put into lenses and accessories for those lenses. You can always upgrade the camera body itself but usually you will keep the lenses and not all are interchangeable. Nikon lenses won't go onto Canon bodies for example. So when you do decide on which camera to get, keep in mind that you may want to choose a brand that you'd want to stick with for a while
     
  5. Joves

    Joves No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    That first links price is a little too low actually. I would go to reseller ratings to see how they fare before ordering. I suggest going to say BestBuy or any other store that carries them and, see how you really like them as, Jon said. The 18-55 is OK but, not great. But if that is the only kit you can afford then it will do for a start, while learning to use the camera. But you have been proviously warned, Dslrs will drain your pockets of cash aquiring new glass and, other gizmos. :lol:
    Here is reseller ratings http://www.resellerratings.com check any site with really low prices first. There are alot of terrible etailer in the photoequipment biz.
     
  6. mrodgers

    mrodgers No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I've seen 3 characteristics of a few dSLR users. I'm not referring to anyone in particular here, but I see one characteristic quite frequently.

    One, folks are quite arrogant when it comes to dSLRs. They call anything that is NOT a dSLR a point and shoot. Point and shoot is just as it says, you point it and shoot it. Nothing more needed, fully automatic. My "point and shoot" has the same settings as the beloved dSLR that all the "only buy a dSLR" crowd spouts about. I am only limited in the ranges of those settings. It seems to be a social status to me, where only the financially well-off can enter and all others are looked down upon.

    Two, some dSLR users think a dSLR along with the highest number of megapixels is the best camera around.

    And three, they are adamant about knowing more about the cam or using anything other than the auto mode, (that includes not switching off the flash even in broad day light to not adjusting the white balance in chandelier light).

    There indeed are people out there who think it is all camera and has nothing to do with the person behind the lens. My coworker is exactly this for example. When asked how his $1500 XTi was, he exclaimed that it takes fantastic pictures, all automatic! The camera does everything. Sounds much like the small point and shoot folks that many dSLR users look down upon about.

    When that coworker asked about my $200 "point and shoot", I told him it was fantastic. I can adjust DOF, get the shutter speed necessary to capture my 4 year old little speed demon who never stops. He said, "Adjust your DO What?"

    Thus, the answer to the question, "Do I need a dSLR?" would be another question. What do you want to accomplish? Do you want to take random snapshots without spending a lot of money? Point and shoots are quite cheap. Do you want to do more with learning photography and learning about exposure and how to blur the background or capture motion? Again, the manual control NON-dSLR cameras are much cheaper. And they allow this just as a dSLR does. If you really want to get deep into the hobby of photography and have money coming out your behind, you can spend the equivalent of what would be a big upgrade to my car and get a dSLR. Then you can join the throngs of arrogant dSLR users and look down upon us non-dSLR, but also non-Point and Shoot users like we are nothing more than garbage to be tossed in the can.
     
  7. mrodgers

    mrodgers No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Limited in what? I already said a camera like mine is limited in the ranges of the settings. But, my camera has auto, presets, Program, Shutter, Aperture, and manual modes. What else is there? A dSLR such as the Rebel XTi also have each and every one of these modes, including Auto. So, you can't designate my camera as a Point and Shoot just because it is not a dSLR. It has the exact same modes, only it is limited in the ranges within those modes (I can't do f/1.8 or f/22 for example.)

    The description "point and shoot" has nothing to do with the mechanics of the cameras. I'm not entirely sure how mine displays on the LCD and eyeview, but it's different than the mirrored "live" view of a dSLR. The image sensors are also different, but that has nothing to do with being a "point and shoot" model either.

    Of course, a dSLR camera is going to have better quality over my $200 camera. But again, this has nothing to do with the description "point and shoot".

    A point and shoot is only that, no manual or semi manual modes. You point it and you shoot it. Both my non-dSLR and your dSLR has that auto mode, but neither are restricted to auto.

    My old camera, a 2 mp Fuji 2650 shot at a set ISO 100. It adjusted the shutter speed for exposure, and it appears after looking through some old pictures, it set the aperture at f/3.5 when zoomed to it's extent and f/8.7 when at it's widest. I could not set anything on the camera, it was fully automatic. That is the description of a point and shoot, no manual settings at all.

    It just seems to me that dSLR users like to feel superior because they spent a ton more money on their equipment than I did, even though I can change all the same settings as they can.
     
  8. Joves

    Joves No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Well my big deciding factor was the shutter lag and, start up times with P&S cameras. That and the D50 came out making it a no brainer. I was still shooting with my film body for more serious stuff. Dslrs are basically instant on and, press to button and, the shot is taken.
     
  9. Jon0807

    Jon0807 TPF Noob!

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    That was one of my biggest gripes with P&S's. I was constantly missing photo ops because of the lag time for start up and between pictures. With a dSLR I only miss photo opportunities because I was too slow to press the button
     
  10. seniorjack

    seniorjack TPF Noob!

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    I definitely agree with the others re going with a dSLR. To me it's a lot more fun...you can be more creative and produce better images, and it doesn't cost an arm and a leg. Though, a warning, you might get addicted, and lenses can be very expensive (I know, I'm a non-recovering addict)!
     
  11. JerryPH

    JerryPH No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The answer is yes to both questions. You could shoot for a year and see how you like photography... but don't you kow the answer to that already?

    Shooting on a P&S and shooting on a dSLR is like comparing driving. You make like driving, but driving a Ferrari vs driving a bus... which would make you enjoy driving more? Thats where you make the decision.

    The deal maker or breaker in the end is budget. If you want to play with the big boys-n-gals, you'll pay a lot more. You can get a nice P&S for 3 digits ($xxx),... most dSLR users have 4 digit ($x,xxx), camera systems within a year after buying into the dSLR system. Again, thats something that only you know if you can get into it or not.
     

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