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Nikon DS7500 DSLR how good is this ?I have just joined this forum as I need some advice ..

suzie2409

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Hi I recently won a Nikon DS7500 DSLR..along with many accessories and lenses ..I have no idea about cameras but I entered it because my son is wanting a camera for Christmas as he adores taking pictures of planes ..he is only 10 ..I think this camera may be worth a lot of money ..I need to know will we be able to use it easily enough ? Many thanks
 

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Hello and welcome, all that gear may be too heavy for a 10 year old...
 
First, the real answer to your question is: it depends upon what he wants to shoot.

Second, for an absolutely beginner, it's a fine camera. Not a beginner's camera (in the sense of it's not simple--not complex but it's not any of the Nikon beginner's models). So unless he sets it on "automatic" he's going to need to learn about aperture, white balance, and shutter speed.

If you think he's really interested in photography (or will be) especially a range of different genres (like: shooting macro, shooting wildlife, shooting sports, shooting portraits) then it's a good camera to have, especially as a starter camera.

Additional thoughts: if by "enjoys taking pictures of planes" you mean at airshows and in-flight, then this will be a very good camera for him. There are better cameras and lens--but you'll be paying a couple of thousands of dollars (just for the body). That 500mm lens will be great for shooting stuff at a distance (like birds, planes, lions and tigers). The 18-140mm zoom will be very good for shooting planes in a museum or of model planes. The filters are probably plastic junk. The macro lens is probably just a magnifying filter. Ditto with the 2.2x zoom (technically a teleconverter)--you use a lot of speed and sharpness with those. But for his purposes (shooting planes in the air or on the ground), the 3 lens will do him just fine.

I strongly suggest that with the camera you include some instruction or a course you sign him up for. Other wise he may just find it easier to use his phone. And the big difference (for him) with this camera vs. his phone is his ability to manipulate stuff like shutter speed (so he can "pan" a plane in flight) or manipulate white balance or aperture to do more than take a snap shot but to conceive of and create a photo.

The first attachment was shot at 200mm at 1/2,500th of a second with a Nikon (also a crop body like the one you got but a more advanced body--the Nikon D500).

The second attachment was shot at 300mm at 1/4,000th of a second (also a Nikon D500).

The third attachment of the Komet Me-163 was at the Udvar-Haazy Air and Space museum near Dulles Airport, 24mm, f3.5, 1/15th of a second and shot with a Nikon D7000 (an older, inferior version of the body you just got--the D7500).

These 3 shots high-light what you can do with the gear you just got and if he learns how to use it. The first two are about shooting at a high-speed and distance. The third is about shooting in low-light with a wide angle lens at the appropriate aperture. And for all 3, playing with white balance (because the light was extreme in all cases and without manipulation would have resulted in inferior photos). Not rocket science (no pun intended--the Me-163 was a rocket), you just need to learn how to use the camera.
 

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First, the real answer to your question is: it depends upon what he wants to shoot.

Second, for an absolutely beginner, it's a fine camera. Not a beginner's camera (in the sense of it's not simple--not complex but it's not any of the Nikon beginner's models). So unless he sets it on "automatic" he's going to need to learn about aperture, white balance, and shutter speed.

If you think he's really interested in photography (or will be) especially a range of different genres (like: shooting macro, shooting wildlife, shooting sports, shooting portraits) then it's a good camera to have, especially as a starter camera.

Additional thoughts: if by "enjoys taking pictures of planes" you mean at airshows and in-flight, then this will be a very good camera for him. There are better cameras and lens--but you'll be paying a couple of thousands of dollars (just for the body). That 500mm lens will be great for shooting stuff at a distance (like birds, planes, lions and tigers). The 18-140mm zoom will be very good for shooting planes in a museum or of model planes. The filters are probably plastic junk. The macro lens is probably just a magnifying filter. Ditto with the 2.2x zoom (technically a teleconverter)--you use a lot of speed and sharpness with those. But for his purposes (shooting planes in the air or on the ground), the 3 lens will do him just fine.

I strongly suggest that with the camera you include some instruction or a course you sign him up for. Other wise he may just find it easier to use his phone. And the big difference (for him) with this camera vs. his phone is his ability to manipulate stuff like shutter speed (so he can "pan" a plane in flight) or manipulate white balance or aperture to do more than take a snap shot but to conceive of and create a photo.

The first attachment was shot at 200mm at 1/2,500th of a second with a Nikon (also a crop body like the one you got but a more advanced body--the Nikon D500).

The second attachment was shot at 300mm at 1/4,000th of a second (also a Nikon D500).

The third attachment of the Komet Me-163 was at the Udvar-Haazy Air and Space museum near Dulles Airport, 24mm, f3.5, 1/15th of a second and shot with a Nikon D7000 (an older, inferior version of the body you just got--the D7500).

These 3 shots high-light what you can do with the gear you just got and if he learns how to use it. The first two are about shooting at a high-speed and distance. The third is about shooting in low-light with a wide angle lens at the appropriate aperture. And for all 3, playing with white balance (because the light was extreme in all cases and without manipulation would have resulted in inferior photos). Not rocket science (no pun intended--the Me-163 was a rocket), you just need to learn how to use the camera.
Hi thank you so much for the detailed reply ..I appreciate your time ..I am going to read over this a few times to try and get my head round it all ..I’m just hoping it won’t be too complicated for him ..take care
 
First, the real answer to your question is: it depends upon what he wants to shoot.

Second, for an absolutely beginner, it's a fine camera. Not a beginner's camera (in the sense of it's not simple--not complex but it's not any of the Nikon beginner's models). So unless he sets it on "automatic" he's going to need to learn about aperture, white balance, and shutter speed.

If you think he's really interested in photography (or will be) especially a range of different genres (like: shooting macro, shooting wildlife, shooting sports, shooting portraits) then it's a good camera to have, especially as a starter camera.

Additional thoughts: if by "enjoys taking pictures of planes" you mean at airshows and in-flight, then this will be a very good camera for him. There are better cameras and lens--but you'll be paying a couple of thousands of dollars (just for the body). That 500mm lens will be great for shooting stuff at a distance (like birds, planes, lions and tigers). The 18-140mm zoom will be very good for shooting planes in a museum or of model planes. The filters are probably plastic junk. The macro lens is probably just a magnifying filter. Ditto with the 2.2x zoom (technically a teleconverter)--you use a lot of speed and sharpness with those. But for his purposes (shooting planes in the air or on the ground), the 3 lens will do him just fine.

I strongly suggest that with the camera you include some instruction or a course you sign him up for. Other wise he may just find it easier to use his phone. And the big difference (for him) with this camera vs. his phone is his ability to manipulate stuff like shutter speed (so he can "pan" a plane in flight) or manipulate white balance or aperture to do more than take a snap shot but to conceive of and create a photo.

The first attachment was shot at 200mm at 1/2,500th of a second with a Nikon (also a crop body like the one you got but a more advanced body--the Nikon D500).

The second attachment was shot at 300mm at 1/4,000th of a second (also a Nikon D500).

The third attachment of the Komet Me-163 was at the Udvar-Haazy Air and Space museum near Dulles Airport, 24mm, f3.5, 1/15th of a second and shot with a Nikon D7000 (an older, inferior version of the body you just got--the D7500).

These 3 shots high-light what you can do with the gear you just got and if he learns how to use it. The first two are about shooting at a high-speed and distance. The third is about shooting in low-light with a wide angle lens at the appropriate aperture. And for all 3, playing with white balance (because the light was extreme in all cases and without manipulation would have resulted in inferior photos). Not rocket science (no pun intended--the Me-163 was a rocket), you just need to learn how to use the camera.
And yes it’s basically taking pics of planes about to take off and land as we live close by to an airport
 
Hello and welcome, all that gear may be too heavy for a 10 year old...
Hi there yes I was thinking that also ..if i sold this how much do you think I would get for it ? And could you recommend something I could maybe get for him that would be less complicated ? He really enjoys taking close ups of planes taking off and landing ..at the minute he used an attachment that goes onto his camera phone it has quite a decent zoom but can be a little fuzzy he wanted something he could take clearer pictures thanks for replyinh
 
Hi there yes I was thinking that also ..if i sold this how much do you think I would get for it ? And could you recommend something I could maybe get for him that would be less complicated ? He really enjoys taking close ups of planes taking off and landing ..at the minute he used an attachment that goes onto his camera phone it has quite a decent zoom but can be a little fuzzy he wanted something he could take clearer pictures thanks for replyinh
First, if you're worried about it being too heavy, mount it on a tripod.

Second, here's the issue for what you want to shoot (take-offs and landings). You'll need a good zoom lens for that. And they aren't cheap. A good 200mm zoom lens with decent speed will cost you about $1,000.

Third, if you are considering selling this kit to fund a camera that is smaller and lighter, go to the best camera story in your area that sells used gear. Bring in all the lens, the charger, the body. They'll look at it and make you an offer. Before you go in, you should first price some alternatives. Because if what you're looking at is going to cost $2,000 and they make you an offer of $500--you'll know to decline.

Last time I checked, the Sony RX10 IV cost about $1,700. To get a 200mm zoom for that would run an addition $500-$1,000 depending upon how fast the lens is. I don't get the sense that you're willing to spend that kind of money.

The price that I see online for a D7500 body is around $600. I don't know what the lens will bring you. And obviously, the condition of any kit affects the price.

I think if your son is shooting mostly take-offs and landings, a really good tripod might be the answer. For most airports, you're going to have a standard approach and take-off so you can set the tripod for that shot.
 
First, if you're worried about it being too heavy, mount it on a tripod.

Second, here's the issue for what you want to shoot (take-offs and landings). You'll need a good zoom lens for that. And they aren't cheap. A good 200mm zoom lens with decent speed will cost you about $1,000.

Third, if you are considering selling this kit to fund a camera that is smaller and lighter, go to the best camera story in your area that sells used gear. Bring in all the lens, the charger, the body. They'll look at it and make you an offer. Before you go in, you should first price some alternatives. Because if what you're looking at is going to cost $2,000 and they make you an offer of $500--you'll know to decline.

Last time I checked, the Sony RX10 IV cost about $1,700. To get a 200mm zoom for that would run an addition $500-$1,000 depending upon how fast the lens is. I don't get the sense that you're willing to spend that kind of money.

The price that I see online for a D7500 body is around $600. I don't know what the lens will bring you. And obviously, the condition of any kit affects the price.

I think if your son is shooting mostly take-offs and landings, a really good tripod might be the answer. For most airports, you're going to have a standard approach and take-off so you can set the tripod for that shot.
Thank you for your reply ..good advice
 

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