Getting ready for NYC...

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by MAtheBanker, Mar 16, 2011.

  1. MAtheBanker

    MAtheBanker TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2011
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Arizona
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Hello all, I'm new here, so pardon me if I'm doing anything wrong! :blushing:

    I bought a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ35 a little over a week ago in preparation for a big trip (my first!) to NYC. I've taken it out on a few test runs and am really liking it so far. One problem I have run into is blurry shots. Unfortunately I don't have any to show you right now as I deleted them all, but if you need examples, I'd be glad to take my dog out tonight and shoot some more. Pictures, that is. Not the dog! :lol:

    I have little to no photography experience. Most of my pictures are taken on my 8MP cell phone camera, but that will not do in NYC! I want to cover my house in these pictures when I get back.

    I know as time goes on I will figure out how to tweak all the settings and get the desired affects, but for now, are there any tips you can give me for getting crisp shots with a moving focus? Even if my dog turns his head slightly during the shot, it's terribly blurry.

    I am slightly familiar with apeture settings. I got the Lumix because it was one of the highest in terms of apeture size in the price range I was looking at. I read that f2.8 is a good setting to achieve bokeh, which is something I REALLY like in pictures.

    Here are some of the shots I took last week:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Thank you all for any help you can give me ;)


     
  2. TheOtherBob

    TheOtherBob TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2007
    Messages:
    289
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    UWS, NY, NY
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    You might want to pick up Understanding Exposure -- it's a very good, very basic book that could help with this sort of thing. But on a very top-line level, there are two ways to avoid blurry pictures (at least that I know of):

    1. A higher shutter speed.
    2. A perfectly still camera and subject.

    If the subject is sitting still (and a lot of NYC subjects are...that building's not going anywhere), then a tripod or image stabilization will help. If the subject is moving (or if you can't use a tripod without someone yelling at you for blocking the sidewalk), then your only option is a faster shutter speed. So how do you get that?

    1. Aperture. This is the size of the hole that lets in light to the camera. You're right that an open aperture allows a better bokeh -- but it also allows a faster shutter speed. Think of it like a funnel, and the sensor like a bucket. If you have a narrow funnel (small aperture) but a lot of time (slow shutter speed), you can fill the bucket. But you don't have a lot of time -- you need to freeze the action before your dog moves. So you need a bigger funnel -- ideally, one that can let in a ton of water all at once. A large aperture does that. Your camera has settings from 2.8-4.4. Honestly, in this type of camera I don't see too many differences in 2.8 versus 4.4 in terms of creative composition or anything like that -- so unless your photos are getting washed out from too much light, just stick with 2.8.

    2. ISO. This is a bit complicated -- but the bottom line is that a higher ISO number means that the digital "film" needs less light for that image and can therefore use a faster shutter speed. However, the tradeoff is that it produces an image that's not as good -- and in some cases is entirely junk. When light is good, use as low an ISO as you can. But when the light is poor, use a high one.

    3. Flash. When it's an option, it's always an option.

    I hope you have a good time here!
     
  3. MAtheBanker

    MAtheBanker TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2011
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Arizona
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit


    That all makes sense. Thank you! I will practice the ISO settings as soon as I get a chance.

    I know I won't be taking a lot of action shots in NYC, but it'll still be nice to know what I'm doing just in case! Plus, my dog is ridiculously cute, but squirmy, so I have to photograph him a lot! :D

    [​IMG]
     

Share This Page