Help to buy a quality camera photo

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by CarbonGhadius, Jul 10, 2017.

  1. CarbonGhadius

    CarbonGhadius TPF Noob!

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    Hello,

    I need help choosing a camera. My budget is around 500 e. I'm going to tour the world photographing designer houses. I need a camera (and maybe lens) to help me do that. It also needs to versatile so I can shoot paper documents, models etc. My first piece of advice was a Cannon 1000D and a lens I forgot the specfications( 18-55 ?...). Finally these photos need to be at least near professional quality.

    Thanks for the help!


     
  2. table1349

    table1349 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Near Professional quality photos don't come from a camera they come from a photographer. An accomplished photographer can take damn near any camera and get outstanding results. Someone that doesn't know Jack Squat about photography could be handed a $60,000 camera system and produce nothing but junk.

    If you are expecting to grab a camera, travel around and get near professional quality lenses without understanding and mastering the basics of photography then all I can say is good luck.

    I would suggest that you start by reading this: Digital Photography Tutorials

    Once you have a basic understanding you can apply it to what your needs are going to be and will have a general idea of what you then need. Until then people can suggest anything from a simple Point and Shoot to a Hasselblad H6D.
     
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  3. qmr55

    qmr55 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Then hire a professional :chuncky:
     
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  4. chuasam

    chuasam Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    there are two chances of you getting professional quality results with an entry level camera and lens with no photography training...the chances are slim and none.
    and Slim just left town.
     
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  5. weepete

    weepete TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    €500 is a very tight budget for real estate photography. Could easily sink 5 times as much in or more to get "pro" results.

    I'd stay away from the entry level Canons, probably realistically looking at an 80D (But at least a t6i) because of sensor performance and banding issues with raising shadows in post. Nikon side a D5600 would probably be good enough for web viewing, but then you really need some quality glass and some good lighting. you'll also want editing software and something to run it on. I don't really know Nikon glass but for canon I'd have thought the 15-35mm L is where you'd really want to be (top end being the 24mm L TS-E and also very handy for getting the DOF for front to back sharpness). Lighting well (yup, more equipment) will be critical as will setting up the place to look awesome. you'll want a knowlege of how to bracket, use HDR to blend exposures without overcooking it (look into luminocity masking) and of course a tripod and remote release. That would be round about what I'd expect for pro real estate stuff.
     
  6. 480sparky

    480sparky Chief Free Electron Relocator Supporting Member

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    I don't know anyone named Jack Squat. When can I expect my $60,000 camera? :bouncingsmileys:
     
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  7. table1349

    table1349 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    You will have to ask his brother Jack Flash. He's kind of hard to find though, he's always jumping around. ;)
     
  8. 480sparky

    480sparky Chief Free Electron Relocator Supporting Member

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    What about their cousin, Jack Schmidt?
     
  9. CarbonGhadius

    CarbonGhadius TPF Noob!

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    Thank you all for the helpful advice. I have seen the light and the errors of my ways. I'll just train hard and use my 80 euro camera phone; I'll surely get very good results. I mean the tools are only as good as the user right? I'll go even further and just ditch my professional quality brushes and just use my fingers to paint from now on!

    Truly I am amazed at the quality and friendliness of this thread. Thank you.
     
  10. jcdeboever

    jcdeboever TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    For interiors, many pros use wide angle glass to cover whole rooms. Most pros are using full frame cameras which are out of your budget. Many use expensive lighting as well because that gives them the opportunity to separate themselves from average photogs. You can do it with APC sensor camera's but I would think, generally, more post work would be required. A lot of post work involved either way to straighten lines, dodge and burn etc. The larger the sensor, normally, better low light performance, clarity, and sharpness.

    As far as documents, close focus lens like a 35mm or 50mm prime works well.

    You may be able to find a used Sony A7 (first generation) full frame with kit lens for around your budget. If you already have glass, get the A7 body and buy an adapter for the glass.

    My second recommendation would be a Sony RX100 (there are several generations like the A7) to fit your budget, it comes with a fixed zoom lens that would meet your requirements. The image quality is excellent and one of the versions will fall into your budget.

    Get a tripod and remote shutter release as well.

    As mentioned, it is more about the photographer but still, have good equipment gives you better odds and let's face it, quality of the image is in the eye of the beholder.
     
  11. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Welcome. Unfortunately you drew up the ire of the forum by mentioning professional and low budget. They assume you have low experience since your asking for equipment advise. And just like you would not expect a new painter to produce a great work of art no matter the quality of brushes. They are basically saying the same thing for an inexperienced new photographer with poor or great equipment.

    Your budget is low for what you want to do. Yes, if the houses has great natural light you can get by with some inexpensive equipment. Or if the houses has good and even electrical lighting. Using camera settings you can also get some good results. The main thing is even lighting. And for the most part thats not the case even in large expensive homes.

    To use natural lighting you need a camera with good ISO performance, and lenses that work well in low light. Unfortunately both are expensive.

    Can someone with lower performing camera and lens also take decent interior photos. Yes, but then you need experience in post processing. So, the reasoning for their short replies is your facing an uphill battle. Not impossible, but for someone new, highly improbable.

    To get professional level pictures of large homes, you need a combination of camera, lens, artificial lighting, and post processing ability. None of which has to be the newest, greatest, most expensive. But they do need to be capable equipment. And given your budget, I am not sure that can be obtained. Especially with lower experience level.
     
  12. chuasam

    chuasam Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    There are some amazing finger painters out there. Your art is only as good as your concept.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2017

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