Highest numbers of photos taken with a single recharge with an instant camera?

vintagesnaps

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Oh, yeah, I've run across that before, what you were describing sounded vaguely familiar.

But I can't think of anything Polaroid that would hold more than one pack at a time. I don't think there ever was... (was there??). The film made now is apparently a slightly thicker little packet of film and emulsion and chemistry since the film packs don't hold the full number that Polaroid originally did (8 instead of 10). I know that when I get to 3 it actually means I only have one left (2 = 0 !! ) But even instant film backs for cameras I think only would hold one pack.

I forgot til I ran across this that there have been large (I mean really big large!) Polaroids, and 8x10s.

Unless you're talking about peel apart film rather than the integrated film Polarod makes now (used to be made by The Impossible Project). The newest film from Supersense ('Doc' Florian to the rescue again!!) will hold less than the standard (6 instead of 10) because each one is separate (and apparently feeds out in a way that seems similar to the old rollfilm Polaroids although I could be mistaken, it isn't out yet). But I don't know of any camera that held more than one pack of film.
 

vintagesnaps

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Cool. Road trip to Vienna!!
 

Tropicalmemories

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My wife's Fuji Instax shoots 10 max per pack.

I wish someone would make an interchangeable lens instant camera. Not a film back for a dslr or medium format, but an instant camera that had a decent set of lenses.
 

limr

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Who remembers that old ASA/ISO 3,000 B&W POLAROID film?

Not the original Polariod, but Fuji made the FP-3000B peel-apart pack film. It was good stuff and then they took it away. I have a stash.


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Derrel

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In the 1970's, ASA/ISO 3,000, meaning REAL ISO 3,000, not pushed 400-speed 35mm or rollfilm, with creamy-smooth grain, was a radical thing. I recall the 104 "bellows + strut" Polaroid I had in the late 70's, and using 3,000-speed B&W for flash photos. It was really an advantage to Polaroid B&W over color at the time. People forget (or do not realize) that ISO 400 color print film was premiered around 1979.
 

vintagesnaps

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Whaddya mean 'old' 3000?? lol Didn't stop making it that long ago, I still have a stash too, which is unfortunately dwindling. But if Doc helps bring us color from Vienna, maybe he and Supersense will work on B&W next.
 

limr

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Whaddya mean 'old' 3000?? lol Didn't stop making it that long ago, I still have a stash too, which is unfortunately dwindling. But if Doc helps bring us color from Vienna, maybe he and Supersense will work on B&W next.

I hope so. I have faith in Doc, but it will still take a long time to get there.
 
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AlbyDB

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Guys I'm really grateful to you everybody for your replies and comments. I'm also learning things on instant cameras with you. I try to explain you what I need precisely. I'm designing a fair stand for an eyewear company and to make the stand interactive for visitors I would like people can wear the glasses and make a selfie of themselves with an instant camera so that they can hang up the photos on a wall. They will become the new models. For this idea I was looking for an instant camera with an high number of films per pack so that the stand staff hasn't to refill the camera so often with the new films.
 

vintagesnaps

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They haven't even gotten color film in production and here I am wanting B&W! I can wait...

Lomography makes a Diana camera that has interchangeable lenses but it's probably still lo fi, just on instant film.

Polaroid could make a camera that uses the film they now manufacture with a lens mount in a brand that makes interchangeable lenses (or make it available in more than one type). Like with a Pentax mount, that'd be good. Wishful thinking.
 

Derrel

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Who remembers that old ASA/ISO 3,000 B&W POLAROID film?

You know, old ASA 3,000 Polaroid..as in 'ASA'..from before ISO supplanted ASA in what? 1975 or so, officially? You know, that 44 years-ago B&W film. lol.
 

vintagesnaps

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Oh, that early Derrel... can't say I've seen or remember that. My stash in my fridge is not that old! although it has taken over a produce drawer and shelf space. Now that we've been down a Polaroid rabbit hole, to get back to the OP...

If you use 600 series Polaroid cameras that use current Polaroid film, it's pretty quick and easy to pop in a new pack, you'd have to put in a new pack after 8 pictures (when the counter shows 2, it's empty). It'll whir and shoot out a dark slide, which is a black piece of card stock covering the film (to keep it light safe til you get the film in the camera). Then it's ready to use. Depends on the camera model, it may have a dark/light lever to adjust as needed, or a piece of plastic to slide to one side or the other for close up shots (about 2-4 feet). Then look through the viewfinder, push a button, and whir... out pops a picture.

You probably would need to do some test shots ahead of time to figure out how close or far to stand to take pictures to show faces and eyewear. You can't get too close with basic Polaroid cameras (probably stay back at least a couple of feet) or pictures will be out of focus.

You may need to have something to put the empty packs & dark slides in if you don't want them laying all over a display table/area. Think about what would make for a nice background too. Polaroids like plenty of light so the 600 models from the '80s - '90s might be best; the 70 models don't have a built flash so you need to use a flash bar (which can be found on ebay etc.) but that seems less practical.

If you get a working camera to try out, save the first empty pack/cartridge. You can use that to test other cameras to see if they're working (it won't shoot out a picture but it should whir and act like it's taking a picture! because the battery in the pack should activate the camera even if it's empty of film).

This is a pretty good demo and explanation of a 600 series camera (I just discovered his Analog Things!). Mine is a more simple model. He's right that's it's a robust camera and hard to destroy. (Dropped mine on a blacktop driveway and it landed hard enough to bounce... so the plastic piece that slides into place for closeups doesn't stay put and I have to use a bit of gaffer's tape to hold it - but it still works!).

This FPP video is from when film was made by The Impossible Project but it shows how both the 70 and 600 models work, etc. The link to the FPP store may be outdated so try their website if you want to look for film. You could also try Lomography, or in the US I think stores like B&H and Adorama carry it, as well as some of the discount chain stores.
Home - The Film Photography Project
 

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