I am really new at this.. any suggestions would be appreciat

e_

TPF Noob!
Joined
Jun 20, 2003
Messages
177
Reaction score
0
Location
...... itinerant ..........
 
Hello again ksshane

...i'm not familiar with that model of camera but may be able to help

I'll do a little bit of research on the Kodak DX4330 (*) later today, study your images more closely and get back to you

Tyler is correct that improvements can be made using Photoshop - but the programme is both expensive and sophisticated; it might be easier to simply optimise your existing setup

Even in the dark room, both digital & analog, it's the old adage of 'garbage in, garbage out' (no offence meant!)

I'm confident you will be able to achieve satisfying results "through the lens" on your existing camera with just a few tweaks

Speak with you soon...

:)

e_

(*) Here's the KODAK MANUAL for your reference
 
OP
K

ksshane

TPF Noob!
Joined
Jul 11, 2003
Messages
25
Reaction score
0
Location
Wichita Kansas
Website
www.aircapitalconstrictors.com
No offense taken.

To tell you the truth. I really didnt expect to get the feedback that I have so far. I was ready for everyone to see my pictures, and just ignore me. I really mean it when I say I appreciate all the suggestions, and ideas that you, and the others have given me.

Thank you
 

e_

TPF Noob!
Joined
Jun 20, 2003
Messages
177
Reaction score
0
Location
...... itinerant ..........
 
Hello again, ksshane

...the Kodak DX4330 model has been designed for the "novice to advanced amateur" photographer and receives high praise in all the reviews i read

A good example and an overview is available HERE

Generally, users of the DX4330 are happy with their purchase and you might the find this DISCUSSION FORUM useful

I presume you have read the INSTRUCTION MANUAL thoroughly and are conversant with all the features and their use

The DX4330 is "fool proof," meaning most functions are automatic and the user has little or no creative control over the settings - which is fine in most situations, but the camera *can* be fooled (as i suspect is happening in your case)

Here's a few pointers:

1. Metering

You will note the colour is different in each image - so much so they might be of different subjects (but i'm presuming it's the same snake)

I suspect this can be attributed to the backgrounds you choose, the framing (zoom length) you choose and the subject itself which is fooling the "matrix" metering system and auto "white" balance

Metroshane suggested a turf green background - that would be a good idea until you understand how the light meter works. It doesn't have to be green, just a mid or neutral tone; a grey blanket would be ideal to start with


2. Zoom

Mrsid thought Image #1 was the best, i agree:

In this image you have used a wider setting, probably the widest at 38mm. Check the instructions on using the OPTICAL ZOOM and don't confuse it's function with that of the DIGITAL ZOOM

Until you understand the affects, my advice would be to only use "optical" (not "digital") and utilise the wider settings - but you'll need to get closer to the subject for better framing (i presume your snake doesn't bite and is not venomous ;) )


3. Flash

This is one of the few areas the user has control - and i suggest you turn off "auto" and set the flash to "fill" until you become fully conversant with this feature

Try some shots with it "off"

Instructions are HERE


4. Lighting

I suspect your camera has problems dealing with the mixed lighting being used: flash, window light and tungsten from the lamps

(Just as side note, Image#6 shows the affect of daylight being mixed with tungsten: you'll note the blue affect - that's window light. I wrote a small tutorial on using COLOUR BALANCE as a creative tool and creating that blue affect, which you might find vaguely interesting)

Until you understand how your camera works, try plain daylight. Place the subject near a window - or take it outside


5. Focusing

Apart from Image#1 your images are soft. In part this is due to depth of field - but read the manual on FOCUSING


6. Depth of Field

Apart from a choice of focal length (zoom) you have no control over this, but you might be able to fool the camera

Try setting the camera on "slow shutter," this will force the camera to close down its aperture and increase your depth of field

Depth of field (or lack thereof) is nicely demonstrated in Image #1 where the foreground and rear of the subject is out of focus. This is effected by the aperture setting


7. Recording

While learning, keep some notes detailing each shot and refer to them when reviewing your images on the computer monitor

Study each shot, try to understand what the camera has done in each case and learn from there

Note: have a look at these EXAMPLES of what the DX4330 can achieve with the various features and settings, well worth a look


Okay ... have you had enough for one day (?!!!)

I've never photographed snakes before and look forward to seeing your results

Best wishes!

:)

e_
 
OP
K

ksshane

TPF Noob!
Joined
Jul 11, 2003
Messages
25
Reaction score
0
Location
Wichita Kansas
Website
www.aircapitalconstrictors.com
Wow!!!

e_,

Thank you very much for taking the time to research all of that for me. I hope I don’t let you down.

That information is very much appreciated, and saved for quick reference. I plan to put it all to good use starting this week, and I look forward to hearing more from you about ways to improve my photos.

Not that it matters, but just so everyone knows. The snakes that have been photographed in the previous photographs are all Columbian Boa Constrictors, but they are all different. What I mean is. They are all different as far as color. They are what reptile collectors call color morphs. I believe the photo that everyone seems to like the best is an Ivory Anery Boa. It is a fairly rare snake, only about 40 or so in the whole world, and I am lucky enough to have 2 of them. Basically what an Anery is, is a snake with no red pigment in its skin. Another one of the pictures is of a Hypomelanist Boa which basically means little or no black pigment. I have some others, but I think you get the idea.


I would just like to say thank you to everyone for taking the time to help me out, and especially to e_ for the great reply above.

I look forward to sharing more pictures with all of you, and also seeing all of your photographs as well
 

e_

TPF Noob!
Joined
Jun 20, 2003
Messages
177
Reaction score
0
Location
...... itinerant ..........
 
...thank you for your kind words

It was very interesting to read some details - especially that of the Ivory Anery Boa without red pigment

At the risk of opening up another one of those most tiresome arguments about 'digital v film' - these creatures might be an example where film offers the photographer better choices

With digital one is somewhat limited with regards colour balance, whereas, with film, there is a bewildering choice for each subject and situation

Digitally, colour corrections can be made in Photoshop, but this requires advanced "colour management" skills if the image is to printed ... which most photographers simply don't have

Best wishes!

:)

e_
 
OP
K

ksshane

TPF Noob!
Joined
Jul 11, 2003
Messages
25
Reaction score
0
Location
Wichita Kansas
Website
www.aircapitalconstrictors.com
Made some adjustments, and took more pictures. I think they came out much better
dhetgostfacegq.jpg
 

luckydog

TPF Noob!
Joined
Jun 21, 2003
Messages
705
Reaction score
3
Location
Australia
Website
www.cracked-lenz.smugmug.com
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
Hi Kkshane,

I haven't read into some of the longer replies you received but i agree the focus and lighting was your main problem. In regard to lighting (on the cheap), i would possibly invest in a couple of bedside table lamps of the low wattage variety. Forget the ceiling light (i don't even use the built in flash indoors if i can help it). Even think of using the heat lamps from the snake enclosures The light from those is usually not too harsh. You can also filter the light using a sheet of paper in from of the light source too.

The focus is a toughy because snakes are a tad inquisitive and like to check out cameras that a poked at them (trust me i have been there done that) and you have too looking at your last photos. The heat lamp may also help here to keep them warm and quiet if they are happy enough to bask under one.

I guess the main thing is keep experimenting, take heaps of pictures, delete heaps of pictures and you will find a few you will be proud of. You have improved just during the time on this forum so there's no looking back .

Lucky
 
M

MDowdey

Guest
e_, way to go dude. thats the same exact digi cam i have. great lesson!!! thats exactly what this forum is all about.



md
 

mrsid99

TPF Supporters
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2003
Messages
2,964
Reaction score
5
Location
Florida
A little DOF with the first and last but that middle one really nails it!
The lighting is perfect so what were you using?
 
OP
K

ksshane

TPF Noob!
Joined
Jul 11, 2003
Messages
25
Reaction score
0
Location
Wichita Kansas
Website
www.aircapitalconstrictors.com
Thank you for the compliments. They mean alot.

Basically I just went over all the information that e_ had given me, and tried letting the camera do most of the work.

The only real changes I made myself was changing the lightbulb in the room to a 50watt soft light, instead of the 75watt generic light I was using before, and I switched the camera flash over to fill flash. I also played with different backgrounds, and found the light blue river rocks, and black base to work best so far.

Im glad everyone likes the pictures, and I hope to have more in the future to share.

Thanks again for all the help. It was, and still is greatly appreciated.
 

Most reactions

New Topics

Top