Inviting criticism: Some photography, from conventional to vaguely morbid.

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by TheMightyGoat, Apr 5, 2009.

  1. manaheim

    manaheim Jedi Bunnywabbit Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Overall, my reaction is that your attitude in your responses kinda sucks.

    :thumbdown:


     
  2. inTempus

    inTempus TPF Noob!

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    If you were an advocate of gun safety, you wouldn't be playing with a loaded firearm and taking pictures of it - especially from the muzzle.

    It's kind of a pet peeve of mine when I see people doing unsafe things with firearms (breaking one or more of the golden rules) then saying "I'm big into gun safety". :thumbdown:

    Other than that, welcome to the forum! :) There are other pro-gun photogs here, but the issue of firearms on this site is somewhat taboo.
    :gun:
     
  3. TheMightyGoat

    TheMightyGoat TPF Noob!

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    Quite. I'm just not used to offering people some pictures to look at and being harangued for the trouble. I understand it may be different on a photography forum where people regularly request detailed advice, but that's what my post was, after all - an offer, not a request.

    The golden rule of firearms safety in question dictates that one never point a gun at a person he doesn't intend to shoot. The purpose of this rule is such that the handler of the weapon learns not to point a gun in unsafe directions, should a misfire occur; misfires themselves being discouraged, of course, by the rule which dictates the handler not put his finger on the trigger until preparing to fire.

    I wasn't pointing a gun at anyone. I was sitting in front of it. I could have sat to the side and taken pictures with only my camera in front of it, but I didn't, because I understand that not pointing a gun at someone is more for the benefit of the person who learns to be aware of his surroundings when holding a weapon than for the off-chance that the gun might spontaneously discharge itself when laying on a photographer's mattress. Should that have happened, however - perhaps if it were struck by a bolt of lightning, igniting the powder in the cartridge - the slot in the cylinder lined up with the barrel was left empty.
     
  4. manaheim

    manaheim Jedi Bunnywabbit Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Wow. I'm so glad your graced us with your "offer".

    :lmao:

    You know you did say "I've been dabbling in photography for a while and am only recently getting into actually learning about it. I'm just going to throw up a few pictures I've taken and see what people say."

    And then snipped at people for giving you ... well... whatever they chose to say.

    I mean, you know... whatever, but... do you like walk into people's homes and get mad at them for daring to offer you a chair that doesn't match your personal ideal of aesthetic? Or food that isn't to your personal liking? :)

    Whatever... I'm getting off this train now... :lol:
     
  5. TheMightyGoat

    TheMightyGoat TPF Noob!

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    An offer to look at the pictures. And, if you'll notice, I thanked the people who responded to the pictures.
     
  6. inTempus

    inTempus TPF Noob!

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    Here they are:


    Rule #1 - All guns are always loaded.
    The only exception to this occurs when you have a firearm in your hands and you have personally unloaded it for checking. As soon as you put it down, Rule #1 applies again.
    Rule #2 - Never let the muzzle cover anything you are not ready to destroy.
    You may not wish to destroy it, but you must be clear in your mind that you are quite ready to if you let that muzzle cover the target. To allow a firearm to point at another human being is a deadly threat, and should always be treated as such.
    Rule #3 - Keep your finger off the trigger until your sights are on the target.
    This we call the Golden Rule because its violation is responsible for about 80 percent of the firearms disasters we read about.
    Rule #4 - Be sure of your target and what is beyond it.
    You never shoot at anything until you have positively identified it. You never fire at a shadow, or a sound, or a suspected presence. You shoot only when you know absolutely what you are shooting at and what is beyond it.

    You can make all the exceptions in your own mind that you would like, the fact of the matter is you loaded a firearm, purposely got in front it while loaded (although you claim the chamber behind the barrel was empty) and took a picture. The act of unnecessarily handing a loaded firearm for the sake of a picture, regardless if you decided to stand in front of it or not, is unsafe in and of itself. They're not toys so fiddling with them unnecessarily for the sake of entertainment is in fact dangerous and does violate rule #2. The rule doesn't make exceptions for "thinking" you left a chamber empty (violation of rule #1), or not having your finger on the trigger. It simply states don't let the muzzle cover anything you don't want to destroy. If you wanted to destroy yourself or your camera, I guess that changes things. :)

    If you want to take pictures of firearms, I suggest you do the following.

    1) if you want to shoot pics of revolvers that appear to be loaded, create dummy rounds that lack gun powder and primers. Simply load a round into an empty case and seat it. That, or cut a wooden rod to length and glue a bullet to it.
    2) make sure the weapon is empty before setting the set, double and triple check to make sure it's not loaded with live ammo.
    3) take your pictures, then once again clear the weapon and store it.

    I shoot pics of weapons too. Here's one I shot this weekend. Note that the magazine is empty and the weapon was checked several times before setting the set.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2009
  7. TheMightyGoat

    TheMightyGoat TPF Noob!

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    I see. So the rule does make exception for being in front of the muzzle when you're really super sure it isn't going to fire?

    You're so full of **** it's spewing from your face.

    I reload my own ammo. I could have made dummy rounds with no powder or primer. I could have sat out of line of the muzzle to take those pictures. For all you knew when you replied to my thread I did both of those things. I purposefully didn't, because I knew I was taking no great liberty with any rules of firearms safety, and I've made no attempt to conceal the fact here. So you don't need to act as though I've misrepresented an empty slot in a cylinder.
     
  8. inTempus

    inTempus TPF Noob!

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    You're an idiot.

    Good bye.
     

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