Lighting Daylight Film w/ Tungsten?

Discussion in 'Lighting and Hardware' started by dvaughn, Feb 12, 2018.

  1. dvaughn

    dvaughn TPF Noob!

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    Hi there. I plan to shoot some medium-format portraits in a studio setup at the end of this week.

    I will be using my Mamiya RB67 with Kodak daylight film (Portra 400 & 800). All lights will be tungsten-balanced.

    I intend to use a lot of colored gels to give the images a stylized, colorful look (blues, purples, red, pinks, oranges, etc.).

    Because I am using saturated, colorful light, should I not even bother using corrective filters on my camera (like 80A or 80B) to account for the fact I am shooting daylight film with tungsten light? Or are those filters still helpful for balancing the color in an accurate way, even if the lighting is meant to be stylized?

    Thanks!


     
  2. 480sparky

    480sparky Chief Free Electron Relocator Supporting Member

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    Shooting daylight film with tungsten will result in a sickly yellow cast. You'll need to gel the lights, or use an 80A filter, to counteract the color temperature difference.
     
  3. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    Definitely, use the proper light-correcting filter!
     
  4. pendennis

    pendennis No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    This is not something you want to try and correct after developing, whether printing, or scanning. When filtering, you'll likely lose around 2 stops with an 80B filter; if you gel the lights, you may lose an additional 1-2 stops.

    But using the correct filter, you'll eliminate one more variable when gelling the lights.
     

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