Lost in buying a camera

Nyxsie

TPF Noob!
Joined
Oct 4, 2020
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Can others edit my Photos
Photos OK to edit
To give you an idea of just how lost I am... this is what I bought: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01BVUD3K6/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

:(

Perhaps I am just being unrealistic, but is there any relatively cheap camera I can buy that is capable of photos like these? I'm wanting to be able to do both portraits and action shots.

IudE0FT8jS-JWfGz4iWBmMolIFF3iTRGAKyOyM4NnqsyQ7tZd_-k9CTe5y-t0EwVysO065E6tR5N4nNDy4tBum7UiK82i_BvJNOxCuexT3u4


GettyImages-867302186-bb5f891abaad4c378b8b71c54c8940dd.jpg


Is-My-Dog-Sleeping-Too-Much.jpg
 
It is hard, if not impossible to shoot these with point and shoot, you will need a DSLR.
 
You might be able to find a good deal on a 'last years model' interchangeable lens compact such as a Fuji X-A5. Add a decent lens of f2.0 or better maximum aperture (lower numbers = better), and it could take pictures like your examples.

Canon and Nikon also do some good interchangeable lens cameras with compact bodies. Look for an 'APSC sensor' in the spec.

Most low cost zoom lens compact cameras like the ones in your Amazon link have tiny sensors like in a mobile phone - so can't really do what you need. Cameras with a changeable lens usually have bigger sensors, and the compact body models also have more user-friendly auto settings.

The intelligent auto function in these higher end cameras are pretty smart, so can generally sort put the settings for you while you are learning the basics. But look for an older model (previous version of current model) to get a good deal.
 
What stands out in those photos (and if they're not your pictures, you should post links to them instead of the actual photos) is shallow depth of field, which is large aperture (iris opening in the lens.) Point-and-shoot cameras don't give you the control over this that you'd want, as they prioritize getting as much clarity into an image as they can. By clarity, I mean nothing blurred, nothing out of focus; a basic snapshot.

You want control of the camera's settings, rather than the camera figuring everything out for itself. The latter is easier but less creative. It's also much cheaper! a sub-200-dollar budget is unrealistic, even with second-hand equipment, for a camera with the controls you're asking about.
 
You could probably not do better on a budget than this kit. Excellent image quality for the price. Good flexibility and gives you the option for adding additional glass in the future. Lots of YouTube video instruction as well to expedite the learning curve.

Nikon D3500 DSLR Camera with 18-55mm and 70-300mm Lenses
 
First:

As stated above the shots themselves are actually done with slr-type cameras.
Most point and Shoots do not have the controls of variables like slrs do.

with that said, a good mirrorless may also be in order.

Now budget:

You can have a high quality and solid performing camera on the used end as well.

KEH, Used Photo Pro, adorama, B&H and a host of others carry good deals on said cameras.
But the real crux is KNOWING what you want.

At that juncture, you will want to venture out to your local camera reseller and pick up, feel and play with various model makes and models so as to know exactly what FITS YOU!!!!

You DO NOT want to take one person's word, that would be like you buying a shirt on Amazon that is a "large" without knowing what "large" is defined by.
 
The short answer is yes, there are a few options you could look at.

The long answer is that it has a few caveats.
The images you've posted are taken at a telephoto length, maybe somewhere between an equivalent to 100-600mm on a 35mm camera. The second two should be manageable if you have a telephoto lens equivalent and a wide aperture (small f number).

The first shot complicates matters, as you'll need a camera capable of continuous autofocus, the ability to see your subject well through the camera so you can track it and a high frame rate (6 fps or greater) will make things easier (though you can pre-focus, but that takes a bit of knowledge and practise).

You'll want a camera that will enable you to control the important settings, so one that as aperture priority, shutter priority and a manual mode. You might just get away with one that has a program or sports mode, but results IME are better consistantly achieved with the former.

You'll probably also need to do a bit of reading about camera basics: how to control exposure, what depth of field is, how to avoid camera shake and motion blur

If it were me, I'd be looking at a used bridge camera like the Kodak Pixpro AZ421, though it does have some flaws. If you can find a good condition used Nikon Coolpix P900 or P1000 or you can save up a bit they'd be a better choice.
 
Perhaps I am just being unrealistic, but is there any relatively cheap camera I can buy that is capable of photos like these? I'm wanting to be able to do both portraits and action shots.
Your new camera is not without its uses. I would call it my "pocket-sized snapshot camera", and always have it with you.

If you want to become more of a photography enthusiast, start thinking about an interchangeable-lens DSLR. You can find a clean, lightly-used example at a deep discount. Stay connected with us on here to get advice. Start by stating your projected budget, even if you need to save up for a while.
 
As designer said, it is a pocket camera so you will take it with you. Hence you are more likely to take pictures.

The more pictures you take, the more you will understand what is it this camera will not do and why. Your task is to understand the numerous features of the camera, so you can judge which features match your type of photography and which features you probably never or will seldom use.

There is a lot of technology built into these little cameras. My wife has a $79.00 k-mart wonder that takes great photos, she can zoom in and crop the photos, she can do close-ups of flowers and host of other things, she never worries about. She is a quilter and has hundreds of quilt show photos, most are available light and come out very well.

As mentioned, I think the biggest issue it the lack of a view finder, it can make composing shot more difficult and can be down right annoying in bright sun.

However, I will bet that once you upgrade to a DSLR, you will still keep this camera handy, for those times when you just have no need for advanced technology but do not want to miss a chance photo opportunity.

Have fun
 
It appears you have a pet. So you want to get low down to get more intimate shots like the ones you showed. Get a camera that has a screen the you can turn upwards so you don't have to lay down on the ground to get the shot. You just hold the camera down low and look down into the screen. Good luck.
 
You might be able to find a good deal on a 'last years model' interchangeable lens compact such as a Fuji X-A5. Add a decent lens of f2.0 or better maximum aperture (lower numbers = better), and it could take pictures like your examples.

Canon and Nikon also do some good interchangeable lens cameras with compact bodies. Look for an 'APSC sensor' in the spec.

Most low cost zoom lens compact cameras like the ones in your Amazon link have tiny sensors like in a mobile phone - so can't really do what you need. Cameras with a changeable lens usually have bigger sensors, and the compact body models also have more user-friendly auto settings.

It appears you have a pet. So you want to get low down to get more intimate shots like the ones you showed. Get a camera that has a screen the you can turn upwards so you don't have to lay down on the ground to get the shot. You just hold the camera down low and look down into the screen. Good luck.
It appears you have a pet. So you want to get low down to get more intimate shots like the ones you showed. Get a camera that has a screen the you can turn upwards so you don't have to lay down on the ground to get the shot. You just hold the camera down low and look down into the screen. Good luck.
scootboneDSC_0394-002.JPG


The intelligent auto function in these higher end cameras are pretty smart, so can generally sort put the settings for you while you are learning the basics. But look for an older model (previous version of current model) to get a good deal.
 
In My Humble Opinion, point and shoot cameras are a waste of money these days. Cell phone cameras have easily caught up with them and may have already passed them by. To have the kind of control you are looking for you need a either a dSLR (digital, single lens, reflex) like a Nikon d3500 or one of the new mirrorless cameras like a Sony a6000. They have interchangeable lenses, will let you control the depth of field (really means depth of acceptable focus), the shutter speed, the point of focus, etc. They will also let you grow with the hobby. For instance, the lenses you might buy for a Nikon d3500 are compatible with their most expensive D6. One thing I have learned from this is that if you buy new, be ready to pay and I always recommend buying new for a beginner. I've been at it since the 70's so I swap with others and buy used all the time. Good luck
 
In My Humble Opinion, point and shoot cameras are a waste of money these days. Cell phone cameras have easily caught up with them and may have already passed them by. To have the kind of control you are looking for you need a either a dSLR (digital, single lens, reflex) like a Nikon d3500 or one of the new mirrorless cameras like a Sony a6000. They have interchangeable lenses, will let you control the depth of field (really means depth of acceptable focus), the shutter speed, the point of focus, etc. They will also let you grow with the hobby. For instance, the lenses you might buy for a Nikon d3500 are compatible with their most expensive D6. One thing I have learned from this is that if you buy new, be ready to pay and I always recommend buying new for a beginner. I've been at it since the 70's so I swap with others and buy used all the time. Good luck

I find cell phones difficult to use. Ergonomically, you need a third hand to release the shutter. You can't see the screen in sunlight. Zoom is digital, not optical for most phones. Nighttime pictures have too much noise. A P&S with a viewfinder in addition to a screen, zoom lens, built for holding and operating is much better. Plus the articulating screen lets you shoot low at pets and children. My P&S is small - it fits in my shirt pocket.
 
The OP - if she ever existed - has not been back to the Forum after making the one post.
 

Most reactions

New Topics

Back
Top