Night Sky/ Milky Way

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by stapo49, Aug 9, 2018 at 7:22 PM.

  1. stapo49

    stapo49 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Hi all, need some advise on taking night sky/ milky way photos. I currently have a Panasonic GX9 and would like to take night sky/ milky way photos. I have been doing some research and have read that it is best to use a full frame /larger sensor. I am not interested in producing star trails.

    I was hoping that people on the forum have had success with micro 4/3 sensors and night sky photography and can give me some tips? Cheers.

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  2. TCampbell

    TCampbell Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    You can adapt the basic guidelines to your camera by using the crop factor.

    The basic rule (because there is a more complicated rule) is you start with a base value of 500. You divide this by the focal length of your lens. The result is the number of seconds you can expose with a camera on a stationary tripod... and not have elongated stars.

    e.g.: If you were using a full-frame sensor camera (sensor is 36 x 24mm) and you had, say... a 14mm lens, it'd be 500 ÷ 14 = 35.7. So you can expose for about 36 seconds and not notice any elongation of the stars.

    But you don't have a full frame camera. Your 4/3rds camera has a crop factor of 2.0x. If you divide 500 by the crop factor (2) the result is 250. Now you can divide 250 by the focal length or your lens ... that is the max time you should expose if you want to avoid elongated starts.

    e.g: If you use a 10mm lens, then it's 500 ÷ 2.0 = 250. 250 ÷ 10mm = 25. So the longest you can expose with a 10mm lens is 25 seconds.
     
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  3. BrentC

    BrentC Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    This is one thing I haven't tried yet but it is more than doable with m43. Use a wide angle, fast lens f1.2-f2.8 and follow @TCampbell 's advice.

    Here are samples of milky way with m43.

    m43 milkyway - Google Search
     
  4. BrentC

    BrentC Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Funny enough yesterday I got Olympus email on tips of taking photos of the Perseid meteor shower this weekend. Take a read and it should help you out.

    Photographing Meteor Showers | Olympus
     
  5. stapo49

    stapo49 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Thanks for the info guys. Very helpful.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  6. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    I use a Canon 5D mk3 with a 17mm lens and generally shoot at ISO 4000, 30 seconds, f/4. It's digital. You can experiment, which is the best way to learn.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. jcdeboever

    jcdeboever TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    I tried it on film. looked like a black, dusty negative. lol
     
  8. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    If the negative was black then you massively overexposed.
     

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