Nighttime airport

Discussion in 'Landscape & Cityscape' started by Foxx, Feb 6, 2012.

  1. Foxx

    Foxx TPF Noob!

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    [​IMG]

    Is there any way I can keep star trails from forming other than upping my ISO/using a wider aperture?

    Also any other C&C is appreciated


     
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  2. timphotos

    timphotos TPF Noob!

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    Cool photo! I know some address star trails via photoshopping... But I gather your not wanting to edit?
     
  3. FRK

    FRK TPF Noob!

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    Definitely a cool photo, I can hardly notice the grain on the photo from the ISO, what settings did you use?
     
  4. Frequency

    Frequency Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Simply marvelous !!!!!

    :D
     
  5. SCraig

    SCraig Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Not with a 20 second exposure. The Earth moves and causes the star trails. It's amazing how much it actually does move in a short period of time but the star trails point it out clearly.
     
  6. Forkie

    Forkie Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Great shot, but where's the airport?!
     
  7. Foxx

    Foxx TPF Noob!

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    My friend is standing on the end of the runway, I was setup on the hillside slightly below it. The lighting is coming from a tower on the opposite end of the runway.
     
  8. Compaq

    Compaq Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I've visited this thread frequently this day, and that image still won't load!!! :gah:


    What you need to escape star trails is simply a faster shutter speed. Also, keep in mind that stars trail "faster" on longer focal lengths. A star moves across the frame four times as fast on 40mm than on 10mm. Another thing to remember is that the stars appear to move around the north star. Stars close to this star moves "slower", and stars longer away move "faster". So, with that in mind, check which part of the sky you're shooting, and at which focal length, in addition to your normal exposure :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2012
  9. Patrice

    Patrice No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Double post - sorry.
     
  10. Patrice

    Patrice No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    You can calculate how fast your shutter needs to be to avoid star trails. The earth rotates 15 arc degrees in one hour. This means that a star will rotate around the north star at a rate of 15 arc seconds in every second of time. The arc length of that movement is dependant on how far away from the north star the object star is. The lens you use has a field of view stated in degrees which can be converted to any other circular measurement so its easy enough for you to figure out how many units of circular measure are covered by each pixel of your sensor. As you've noticed by now this is dependant on focal length of the lens. Your shutter speed needs to be such that the arc length of the star's movement does not go across more that just a few pixels. The amount of pixels is determined by the image viewing distance and enlargement.
     
  11. r a y

    r a y TPF Noob!

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    This is absolutely beautiful! Well done!
     
  12. manaheim

    manaheim Jedi Bunnywabbit Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I've no clue of the answer to your question, but the shot is very neat. :)
     

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