Noob...

Discussion in 'Welcomes and Introductions' started by Salmah, Jul 30, 2017.

  1. Salmah

    Salmah TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2017
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Hi everyone! :D

    I'm Salmah, from Aus.
    I have been into photography for a few years now, but my 'switching from auto to manual stage' has been taking quite a while....

    Anyway, I'm hoping to connect with the rest of the photography community and get advice, tips, etc, etc etc!

    Cheers :)


     
  2. snowbear

    snowbear fuzzy-wuzzy Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2006
    Messages:
    14,140
    Likes Received:
    5,450
    Location:
    SoMD
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Welcome aboard. Looking forward to some of your shots
     
  3. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    May 4, 2006
    Messages:
    4,021
    Likes Received:
    495
    Welcome. You don't have to quit auto cold turkey. Nothing wrong with Aperture or Shutter priority. :1219:
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. Dean_Gretsch

    Dean_Gretsch Always looking... Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2016
    Messages:
    5,688
    Likes Received:
    3,685
    Location:
    Northeastern Pennsylvania
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Welcome! For me, I have to just jump right in and get my hands dirty if I want to learn something. I believe this hobby might just take awhile to " get ".
     
  5. smoke665

    smoke665 TPF Supporters Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2016
    Messages:
    7,930
    Likes Received:
    3,409
    Location:
    Alabama
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Welcome. For me manual is the logical process of simplification. Today's cameras are technology wonders, but trying to learn one thing while the camera is trying to second guess your intent is impossible. Even on manual there were menu options that still affected the final image. Turn off all the option until you can get as close to the basic exposure triangle as possible, then add back menu options as needed.
     
  6. table1349

    table1349 Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2006
    Messages:
    0
    Likes Received:
    0
    Wait a minute, Are you telling me that the A & S on that dial thingy don't stand for Amateur and Student? I suppose you are going to tell me next that the P doesn't stand for Professional. :biggrin-new:

    @Salmah Welcome to the forum. As others have said, shooting in manual is about understanding the exposure triangle. You need to learn what the compromises are that you will have to make with each portion of the triange to get the shot. Seldom do all the stars align perfectly where you aperture, shutter speed and ISO are exactly where you want them and your entire shot is completely and perfectly lit from foreground, subject, and background. Well not unless you are controlling the lighting as well. The easiest way I know is to pickup a camera, set it to manual, go shoot, come back, review, learn from your mistakes and repeat the process over and over until you have a good feel for the process.
     
  7. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    41,763
    Likes Received:
    15,896
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit


    I like to shoot in M mode in AUTO-ISO with my Nikon. I set the camera up before each day/scenario/situation. First in the AUTO-ISO setup menu, I set the slowest-allowable shutter speed, and I pick the Maximum-allowable ISO level that I am willing to go up to.

    Then, when I am out shooting, I set the shutter speed I want, and the f/stop I want, and with the camera in Matrix Metering mode, in autofocus mode, and Manual exposure mode, the camera's metering system can "make it happen", and can raise or lower the ISO to deliver the right exposure level for the pre-selected speed and f/stop that I have chosen for the conditions and the creative effect I want.

    This type of camera setup also allows me to use the EC, or Exposure Compensation system to lighten or darken my pictures, as desired. This type of camera metering and setup is often used by action shooters, or by people who understand that with modern sensor Nikon d-slr cameras, this is now, finally, a viable way to shoot. Ten years ago, or more, this was NOT nearly as viable a way to meter and shoot, because sensors had such a narrow window where the image quality was acceptable.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2017
    • Like Like x 2

Share This Page