Nowhere to Bounce

cjdesu6

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Hi, how do you shoot with flash in a very large indoor area (nowhere to bounce) without getting those flash hotspots and harshness. Photo

I have searched around and many people seem to say that diffusers like the Stofen are pointless if you have nowhere to bounce. Due to circumstances I can not take the flash off camera and can not carry around an umbrella.

Thanks!!
 

cptkid

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Softbox, umbrella, beauty dish.

Why cant you take the flash off camera?
 

Buckster

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Wear one of these:

chef-hat-32735.jpg


Then, just turn the flash head backwards to point at your hat - instant large diffuser!

And don't forget the mustache. ;)
 

Big Mike

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For situations like that, I have this...Lite Genius Super-Scoop II Flash ModifierSUPER-SCOOP II B&H It's not perfect light, but it can be a little better than bare flash.

It is a bit pricy, but I got mine as a sample directly from the inventor. You can make something similar for a few dollars worth of material. DIY Reflector-Diffuser

But also, I sometimes don't want to use something so large on my flash...and I'll just shoot with bare flash, directly at the subject. Yes, it can make for bright reflections on their faces etc., but it's better than a blurry shot. Also, it makes a big difference is the shot has a good ambient/flash ratio.

I also have the LumiQuest 80-20 kit that is linked above. It's OK, but not nearly as big as the Super Scoop...and thus, not nearly as effective at softening the light. But I do love that the 80-20 kit folds up into a flat pouch, so it's easy to have with you.
 

Big Mike

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I have that one too...and I really like it as an adjustable bounce card. But when there is no bounce, the Demb card really isn't much bigger than the bare flash....and it still causes a loss of light compared to bare flash. But I like it because you can easily bend it back, out of the way, to shoot bare flash, then bend it back when you need a bounce card.
 

manaheim

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Another trick you can use is to crank up your ISO a little and still bounce off the ceiling. I've used this in ceilings as high as 20' or so with great success and minimal IQ issues. 800-1200 ISO usually works.
 

Big Mike

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Another trick you can use is to crank up your ISO a little and still bounce off the ceiling. I've used this in ceilings as high as 20' or so with great success and minimal IQ issues. 800-1200 ISO usually works.
Good point. 20' ceilings are still quite bounceable IMO. When I abandon bounce flash, it's usually 40+ foot ceilings...and/or weird colors or angles.
 

manaheim

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Another trick you can use is to crank up your ISO a little and still bounce off the ceiling. I've used this in ceilings as high as 20' or so with great success and minimal IQ issues. 800-1200 ISO usually works.
Good point. 20' ceilings are still quite bounceable IMO. When I abandon bounce flash, it's usually 40+ foot ceilings...and/or weird colors or angles.

Mismatched ceiling heights and lots of random beams can also play hell with this.
 

Big Mike

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I shot a wedding reception last summer in the absolute worst location for bounce flash. It was a community hall and the front with the dance floor area, was open to the second level above. No bouncing there.

But worse than that, the other side of the room (where they put the tables etc) had a decent ceiling height, a little less than 20 feet, but every 8 feet, there were fully enclosed, dark wooded rafters about 5-6 feet deep. So every 8 feet was basically it's own enclosed bay when you looked up at the ceiling. So I could bounce off walls or ceiling...but only if I was in the same bay as my subject.
 

manaheim

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I shot a wedding reception last summer in the absolute worst location for bounce flash. It was a community hall and the front with the dance floor area, was open to the second level above. No bouncing there.

But worse than that, the other side of the room (where they put the tables etc) had a decent ceiling height, a little less than 20 feet, but every 8 feet, there were fully enclosed, dark wooded rafters about 5-6 feet deep. So every 8 feet was basically it's own enclosed bay when you looked up at the ceiling. So I could bounce off walls or ceiling...but only if I was in the same bay as my subject.

Ugh.
 

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