orthographic again

Grandpa Ron

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I posted this is the B&W forum but no one replied. Since I did not know how to cancel the post I am reposting here in the Film section.

I am curious if anyone uses orthographic film?

As I understand it, it is only blue/green light sensitive, and some film seems to be used for photo-copy work.

Are there any advantages to using it?
 
I'm wondering if you are asking about orthochromatic films vs panchromatic? It may be the terminology that's confusing me.
 
I've shot a few rolls of Ilford Ortho 80 plus. I don't know if there's any advantage to it, I just like the way it looks; it's something different (or more old fashioned). Anything red comes out black and blue skies very quickly over expose.
Supposedly you can handle the film under a safelight, but I haven't tried that yet.
Post in thread 'Boats' Boats
This was shot with Ortho 80 plus on 35mm. The boat has a red hull with a white superstructure. I don't have a picture in colour, but it's from the 2021 Waterford Tugboat Roundup in Waterford, New York.

Side note: that picture was a scan of a print in which I burned in the sky, otherwise you couldn't see the clouds.
 
I posted this is the B&W forum but no one replied. Since I did not know how to cancel the post I am reposting here in the Film section.

I am curious if anyone uses orthographic film?

As I understand it, it is only blue/green light sensitive, and some film seems to be used for photo-copy work.

Are there any advantages to using it?
What you want to know about is orthochromatic film. Orthographic, or orthography, is an entirely different subject. Read about the film here:
 
Like mentioned above I'd only shoot it if you like blue skys white and anything red black instead of mid-gray.
 
Thanks for the replies. I am experimenting with a 1910 4x5 view camera that I restored and though I might try some vintage type photos. Since the cost of 4x5 is rather high I thought I would find out what others had done.

A 35 mm roll should tell me what I need to know a lot cheaper.
 
Not every scene has red colors or blue sky in it.
The point here is that it's perhaps better suited to street or cityscape photography, over landscape. ;)

Think red brick buildings or old brownstones. They can look very dramatic. People's clothing has great variety and can look great with it, as well.


A 35 mm roll should tell me what I need to know a lot cheaper.
Absolutely! Depending on your subject matter you may love it.

Have fun - and post your results here if you'd like. :)
 
t's perhaps better suited to street or cityscape photography, over landscape.
Ilford says it's "Ideally suited for landscape photography."
 
...if you like your blue skies white, go for it. ;)
I said nothing about whether or not it's for me, and I'm not going to pretend to know more about the film than those who make it.
 
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I said nothing about whether or not it's for me, and I'm not going to pretend to know more about the film than those who make it.
Who said you did? :icon_scratch: Weird comment.

At the end of the day, it's always photographer's choice! Some have more experience than others, and we get to decide what works for us and what doesn't.
 
Ortho just means it’s only sensitive to the blue/green spectrum and not red. It’s how you can handle it under a dark red safelight in the dark room.
 
Let's face it, if I am curious enough to restore a turn of the last century 4x5 camera and hunt down a suitable 1950's vintage lens; there is a good chance I will try ortho film just to see what happens. :)

It is the curse of the incessant, "What happens if I do this." tinkerer. I am glad to know I can work with 35 mm a lot cheaper.
 
As a portrait guy, I am guessing it will make red lipstick black and I wonder how it renders skin since it contains a fair amount of red.
 

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