Professional 'enhanced' scan vs. DIY scan...

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by Peeb, Jan 23, 2018.

  1. Peeb

    Peeb Semi-automatic Mediocrity Generator Supporting Member

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    OK- you can pay a small up-charge (about 10 cents per image on a 36 roll) for 'enhanced' scan (roughtly 3000x2000) from an online vendor. Let me give you an example and then pixel peep just a bit.

    Took my latest roll and went to the first image that was in focus and properly exposed (ugh- shot #5!). It's a shot of my D610 set up for a shot of the upcoming sunrise. Here is the difference:

    1. Image they sent me at approx. 3000x2000 resolution (but compressed to fit here)-
    000200220005-small.jpg

    Here is my scan of the supplied negative (Epson V600)-
    IMG_440-small.jpg

    The white balance is (to me) much more accurate on my scan, but it you want to accentuate the golden hour, their version is nice. Let's take a close-up look.

    Here is left upper side of the camera- professional scan:
    scan-peep.jpg


    And my version:
    440-peep.jpg


    Look at how 'jaggie' the vertical outline of the prism housing is on the internet version!

    I'm pretty pleased with my scanner's ability to meet/exceed the pro shop. I would NEVER want to invest the time to DIY all 36 shots, and due to pure convenience I'm inclined to keep paying the $4.00 per roll for enhanced scanning, but if I really want a super clean shot, I would not hesitate to dig out the negative and do it myself.

    NOW, for $9.00 per roll you can get them to do a super resolution scan and perhaps that is beyond what I could achieve, but I doubt I'd regularly pay that- I just have too many 'clunkers' on most rolls that are not worthy of that!


     
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  2. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    I dunno....their scan looks superior to yours, at least to me. Higher acutance on theirs...more edge crispness on the mode dial lettering. At the speed my scanner works, $9.00 for a roll of 36 scans is a good deal, based on time needed to scan 36 frames. Anyway...thanks for posting. As far as $4 per roll for the kind of scans they are giving you? A BARGAIN!!!
     
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  3. Peeb

    Peeb Semi-automatic Mediocrity Generator Supporting Member

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    I agree on the price for sure.

    ALSO, I agree that I really like the resolution of the letters on the wheel on the pro version- check out the H in particular. Those artifacts and jaggies are troubling to me. Let me do a little post on their verson and I'll see what I can do...
     
  4. JonA_CT

    JonA_CT TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    I hadn’t even thought about the amount of time to scan 36 frames in a flat bed. You all have convinced me to stop grumbling about the developing and scanning costs for my lab. (I mean...I shouldn’t anyways...their work is flawless)
     
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  5. Peeb

    Peeb Semi-automatic Mediocrity Generator Supporting Member

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    If scanning isn't a labor of love, then it's just...

    labor.

    It really does take some time. Some images are worth it- most (of mine) are not!
     
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  6. Ysarex

    Ysarex Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Bleep scanning and bleep bleepin' Epson!

    I've been doing a lot of film scanning in recent months. Bottom line: There's no beating a dedicated film scanner that's engineered for the format. With that said here's a scan of a 35mm transparency from a Nikon Coolscan at 50% of the "enhanced" resolution your lab provides (1500 px):

    [​IMG]

    Only concerned here with resolution so I'm not fussing about color or even contrast that much.

    That Nikon Coolscan is on my desk at the college lab. I can use it anytime I want. In fact I'm the only one who can use it since the college abandoned its use years ago when drivers for the lab computers were no longer available. (I have VueScan on my laptop). I also have a new Braun ($2000.00) scanner at work and a fleet of Epson V series scanners. But at home I have an Epson V-600 on my desk -- just like Peeb. It sucks. But it's affordable and it's convenient. Here's that same transparency at the same res from the Epson V-600.

    [​IMG]

    And that's with modifications!! First modification: Epson instructions tell you to scan film through the film base! WTF!! I flipped the film over in the scanner and scanned it properly. Second modification: I shimmed the film holder so the scanner would focus on the film. You can buy an adjustable height film holder for the scanner: The Single Channel Variable Height MF Holder For Epson. I just sat down one afternoon and kept running test scans until I got the right height and then shimmed the film holders.

    [​IMG]

    That's the end of a plastic slide mount that I cut off and glued to the bottom of my film holder -- another on the other end of course.

    But all I got from those two modifications is the scan above. Epson has an unsharp mask filter built in and I assume Peeb used it for his scan. I have it turned off in the above scan because it sucks.

    Epson's claim for the resolution of their V series scanners is Trumpian. They are not capable of 6400 PPI. They are not capable of 2000 PPI! (see above scan).

    So what next? I only use mine with 120 film and so a bigger neg goes a long way to reducing the need for the kind of res you get from a dedicated film scanner. But a lot of folks use them for 35mm. Can we do better? Here's that same image again scanned with the Epson but this time enhanced.

    [​IMG]

    That sure looks better. In fact at this screen res it looks comparable to the Nikon scan. No way is this worth the time and trouble (I'm retired) but what I did was:

    1. Over scan the transparency to start (4800 PPI).
    2. Hand that scan over to anti-blur software. The anti-blur algorithms they've come up with in recent years seem very well suited to enhancing mediocre film scans. I used this: SHARPEN projects professional | PROJECTS SOFTWARE
    3. Problem with anti-blur algorithms is they create artifacts bigly.
    4. So I added simulated film grain to cover over the artifacts -- it's film after all!
    5. Sampled down the image from 4800 PPI to 3000 PPI.

    Here's a side by side at the full res of 3000 PPI at 100% of the sign above the door.

    Joe

    scan_comp.jpg
     
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  7. webestang64

    webestang64 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I do this for a living and here are the best film scanners I have ever used.......

    1. Drum scanner.....time consuming and expensive but you can enlarge a well shot 35mm neg into a billboard.
    2. Noritsu 1800 series. Buying one yourself will be very hard and cost a bit but using a lab with this scanner is the best way to get close to a Drum scan.
    3. Nikon Coolscan.....I've used the 5400, 8000, 9000 and all have done a wonderful job. You can get them for a good price and still get them repaired as well as get software.
    4. Any other film scanner.
    5. (Insert name here) flatbed scanner. Granted I use a Epson XL10000 for 4x5 and up film scans but for anything smaller.....dedicated film scanner.

    FYI......cost at my lab.
    For dev and scan of a roll C-41 35mm $10.95 (dev $6 scans $4.95).
    Each scan will be around 3130x2075 (8x12 at 260res) 18.6mb file.
    We offer a 85mb file scan for (dev $6 scans $15.00) $21.00.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2018
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  8. vintagesnaps

    vintagesnaps Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I usually get scans when I get film developed; for me it's worth it to not have to do it all myself or to have to buy an expensive printer/scanner. I've scanned some of my darkroom prints and had a couple professionally done and with those I've gotten good results (working from an original that's 8x10 to make a copy print that's 8x10).
     
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  9. webestang64

    webestang64 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I use my Epson V700 w/Vuescan software and get wonderful results. Although 100% of my BW that gets sold is a one off print.
     

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