SB700 coming tomorrow

RichardsTPF

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A SB-700 and a Vello - Bounce Dome will be delivered to my door tomorrow. Can''t wait to get hands on it.

After reading the threads on TPF and google, I get some info about bounce flash from the wall/ceiling, reflector, aperture controls background & shutter controls the subject.
Any suggestion and online tutorial reference would be appreciated.
 

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2WheelPhoto nailed it.
 

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RichardsTPF said:
A SB-700 and a Vello - Bounce Dome will be delivered to my door tomorrow. Can''t wait to get hands on it.

After reading the threads on TPF and google, I get some info about bounce flash from the wall/ceiling, reflector, aperture controls background & shutter controls the subject.
Any suggestion and online tutorial reference would be appreciated.

I think you have the aperture and shutter backwards, in a way. Shutter controls how much ambient light get in - darker background = faster shutter speed. Aperture is for exposing the subject.........
 
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RichardsTPF

RichardsTPF

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I think you have the aperture and shutter backwards, in a way. Shutter controls how much ambient light get in - darker background = faster shutter speed. Aperture is for exposing the subject.........
Yes, you are right.
 

jwbryson1

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I think you have the aperture and shutter backwards, in a way. Shutter controls how much ambient light get in - darker background = faster shutter speed. Aperture is for exposing the subject.........

I think this is 95% correct but I don't think it is technically 100% correct. My only "issue" with this is that aperture will certainly have some limited effect on ambient exposure. SS is clearly the starting point for adjusting AE but if you need to further kill AE, stopping down the lens a bit further will also reduce AE.
 

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jwbryson1 said:
I think this is 95% correct but I don't think it is technically 100% correct. My only "issue" with this is that aperture will certainly have some limited effect on ambient exposure. SS is clearly the starting point for adjusting AE but if you need to further kill AE, stopping down the lens a bit further will also reduce AE.

Yes but wouldn't stopping down the lens possibly underexpose your subject - depending on your distance from the subject?
 

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jwbryson1 said:
I think this is 95% correct but I don't think it is technically 100% correct. My only "issue" with this is that aperture will certainly have some limited effect on ambient exposure. SS is clearly the starting point for adjusting AE but if you need to further kill AE, stopping down the lens a bit further will also reduce AE.

Yes but wouldn't stopping down the lens possibly underexpose your subject - depending on your distance from the subject?

I don't think so if you're using flash because it's generally not affected by aperture.

http://neilvn.com/tangents/2009/11/10/when-aperture-does-not-control-flash-exposure/
 

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jwbryson1 said:
I don't think so if you're using flash because it's generally not affected by aperture.

http://neilvn.com/tangents/2009/11/10/when-aperture-does-not-control-flash-exposure/

How is it not affected by aperture??

I asked Derrel how to expose with flash and here is his answer

Derrel said:
Is it guesswork? Well, it's sort of mathematically-regulated. GN divided by distance from the flash to the subject determines the f/stop. "Most" decent flash units have a GN, in feet, of around 100 to 110. SO, if the flash is 10 feet from the subject, you take 10 feet, and divide that into 110...which is 11...or f/11. So, at 10 feet, the flash is going to give an f/11 exposure reading, at ISO 100.

If you have two,identical lights, you can aim one at the subject from 20-40 degrees off to the side of the camera to subject axis line. The FILL light can be right on top of the camera. It should be CLOSE to the camera's position. As to power, set the main light to FULL power, and the fill light to 1/2 power, and put the lights the same distance from the subject. That will give a 3:1 lighting ratio.

The other way to do it is to place the lights spaced at different distances. Put the main light at 5.6 feet, and the fill at 8 feet, and you will also get the 3:1 ratio. The f/stop lineup is also a distance lineup in feet, so 2.0__2.8__4.0__5.6__8.0__11.0__16.0__22.0__32.0. Each distance yields ONE f/stop MORE, or LESS, than the distance to its left, or right. Not kidding.

A very,very EASY way to figure out what the f/stop is is a piece of heavy-duty string, with a few knots tied in it. FIgure out what distance gives a good,solid exposure at f/8 or f/9.5, and tie a knot in the string, and always use that light as the MAIN light.


This is from the link you posted:
My problem with the first statement is that it disregards that aperture and ISO both control ambient exposure as well.

Where this ‘short-cut’ came into being, is that with manual flash, our exposure is controlled by 4 things: aperture, ISO, distance (from light source), and power of our light source, and this leaves shutter speed as our only independent control for ambient light.

It is essential to understand that with TTL flash, things change a little. Actually, things change a lot, since exposure control for manual flash and TTL flash are entirely different.
 

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jwbryson1 said:
I don't think so if you're using flash because it's generally not affected by aperture.

http://neilvn.com/tangents/2009/11/10/when-aperture-does-not-control-flash-exposure/

And I was just correcting him in that he said shutter speed is for exposing the subject and aperture was for ambient. Of course everything is going to affect the overall exposure but if aperture isn't affected by flash then I don't really understand how you would expose the image

Bear in mind I'm a NewB on OCF so I'm still learning this as well. Manual flash and I-TTL flash are completely different.

Neil also says on that page the following:
"In other words, with TTL flash, our choice of aperture, (within reason), has no effect on flash exposure. (This is also true for our choice of ISO.)"

I think you may be right on Manual flash which is controlled by ISO, aperture, distance from the subject and power of the flash.

This stuff is really hard for me to wrap my brain around. It's not always intuitive to me. :scratch:
 

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