Sony Lens Need advice

hazard

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i havent been takin photo for long and want to buy a new lens as im only useing my 18-55mm kit lens. im new to buying lenses and just wanted to now would a Sony DT 50mm F1.8 SAM Lens go on my A390 or do i need a specific lens kind or does any sony lens go on a sony camera? i now this lens is a very gd one. and does anyone now if its gd for baby photography and wedding? iv hard there gd but want to make sure
 
The Sony 50mm DT is compatible with your camera.
Sony DT lenses are made for APS-C sensors (like the type in your A390) ... this will not work properly on the Full Frame Sony cameras.
Third party lenses will also be marked in some way to indicate they are made for APS-C.

This lens will have an effective focal length of about 75mm ... it has good IQ, and the wide aperture gives a lot of DoF control.
I do not take portraits, so I cannot say if this focal length is great for that.
 
What does 'gd' stand for? Clearly your 'o' key works... So I hope it doesn't stand for 'good'.

The 50mm focal length is pretty desirable for portraits. Low distortion, large aperture (on primes), workable indoors (even on an APS-C), and usually the price is pretty good on 50mm primes. I used it when I had a crop body quite a bit, and continue to use it on FF cameras. I highly recommend it.

Kind of disheartening that this is specifically for an APS-C body though... I can understand a 35mm prime being made for APS-C, but 50mm just begs to have a 35mm sensor behind it.
 
I have that lens, used it on my a390 and now on the a65 and it's the lens I use the most so far. I'm a new dad so plenty of portraits and baby pictures !

On sale right now on the Sony web site.

The 35mm might be a good alternative too.
 
Kind of disheartening that this is specifically for an APS-C body though... I can understand a 35mm prime being made for APS-C, but 50mm just begs to have a 35mm sensor behind it.

One of the reason's why I have a Minolta AF 50mm f/1.7.

The Sony 50mm f/1.4 is full frame.
 
IIRC the Sony lens is priced at 125$

I think it's a good entry level price for someone wanting to gain experience using a prime lens. And it does offer a significant IQ improvement over the kit lens.

A side question: Other than future proofing against a future upgrade to a full frame camera. Is there an inherent advantage to using full frame lenses ?

The price difference is significant.

I know there has been other conversations on the subject. I'm asking before this topic gets found by the usual crowd...
 
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Kind of disheartening that this is specifically for an APS-C body though... I can understand a 35mm prime being made for APS-C, but 50mm just begs to have a 35mm sensor behind it.

One of the reason's why I have a Minolta AF 50mm f/1.7.

The Sony 50mm f/1.4 is full frame.

I have the Minolta Maxxum 50mm f1.7 too. Good lens. Nice price.
 
IIRC the Sony lens is priced at 175$

I think it's a good entry level price for someone wanting to gain experience using a prime lens. And it does offer a significant IQ improvement over the kit lens.

A side question: Other than future proofing against a future upgrade to a full frame camera. Is there an inherent advantage to using full frame lenses ?

The price difference is significant.

I know there has been other conversations on the subject. I'm asking before this topic gets found by the usual crowd...

Not sure how having a full frame could be a disadvantage.
 
That is not the question I asked.
 
That is not the question I asked.

The advantage to buying full frame lenses is so that you won't have to sell your APS-C lenses at a loss when you want to upgrade.
 
Thanks for the input.
 
A side question: Other than future proofing against a future upgrade to a full frame camera. Is there an inherent advantage to using full frame lenses ?

The price difference is significant.

Yes there is an advantage to full frame lenses. Other than the obvious one of not having to get all new lenses when/if you go to a full frame, there is the matter of the projected image circle of the lens. We all know a XXX mm lens is a XXX mm lens and that a crop sensor body is going to get the same image from both a crop lens and a full frame lens of the same focal length. A lens designed for a crop sensor body will project an image circle just large enough to cover a crop sized sensor. A Full frame lens projects a larger image circle due to being made to provide coverage for a full-frame sized sensor (or 35mm film frame). The difference that really counts is that IF a lens is going to show a weakness it will usually be at the edge of that image circle (generally as being a bit softer looking than the center). A full frame lens on a crop body gives you the same exact image as a crop lens, BUT if there is going to be a touch of softness in a lens it will generally fall outside of the sensor area and the image will be clear and crisp corner to corner. On a crop lens though, if there is going to be softness at the extreme edges of the image circle it will fall on the sensor and show on your final image.
 
SJGordon, thanks for that extra info.

Now that you've mentionned it, it makes perfect sense. I'll pay closer attention to the MTF graphs and compare the area corresponding to the edge of my croped sensor.

Hazard, have you pulled the trigger on a lens yet ?
 

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