The Fundamentals?

RainDog9

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Hey folks,

I've been chatting with a few of you over the past few hours about aperture, sensor size, and capturing DOF. I went out today to experiment with shutter speed down by the river. I caught the sunset just in time, and was greeted by a flock of migrating geese. Unfortunately I didn't get the lighting quite right, but wanted to see if I could catch a decent shot or two. One battery and a Gig later I think I got one decent photo:

http://postimg.org/image/p952o2twd/

Any pointers on a subject like this? As someone new to photography, should what "mode" should I focus on?

Thanks!
 
Manual is difficult because you are juggling 3 variables; aperture, shutter speed, film speed. I like aperture priority mode, as it let's me set the aperture I want and the ISO, while the camera selects an appropriate shutter speed to achieve a decent exposure.

You could try shutter priority mode which lets you set the shutter speed, while it sets the aperture automatically to get a decent exposure.
 
Any pointers on a subject like this? As someone new to photography, should what "mode" should I focus on?
I'm not a birder, but it seems to me that those geese are kind of like pets, although there is the water, but the sun is not bright, so you could try the pet portrait mode.

Although, once you begin to put it all together, you can see what the camera is suggesting in terms of shutter speed and aperture, and then make some adjustments based on what you perceive as the true conditions.

Also, there is the ISO adjustment. So where is the camera set to on ISO right now? Probably "auto". You can go into full manual and set the ISO, set the aperture and shutter speed based on the meter reading. Or based on your intuition. It takes time and practice for all that to happen smoothly, and you don't need to jump on into full manual just yet, but someday you should try it.

Meanwhile, get an idea of how the camera works in trying to produce a "good exposure". Look at the settings the camera has selected, and file that away in your memory with the conditions that you see. There are also some "rules of thumb" like the "sunny 16 rule". (google it)
 
Hey folks,

I've been chatting with a few of you over the past few hours about aperture, sensor size, and capturing DOF. I went out today to experiment with shutter speed down by the river. I caught the sunset just in time, and was greeted by a flock of migrating geese. Unfortunately I didn't get the lighting quite right, but wanted to see if I could catch a decent shot or two. One battery and a Gig later I think I got one decent photo:

http://postimg.org/image/p952o2twd/

Any pointers on a subject like this? As someone new to photography, should what "mode" should I focus on?

Thanks!

Ok, well a couple of tips in general, first would be for focusing. When your taking pictures of animals or people you want to select the eye as the focus point if at all possible. That's the first place peoples eyes will be drawn to when looking at the image so that's the part of the image you really want to be at it's sharpest.

When shooting wildlife or really any subject that tends to move about your best bet is usually shutter priority mode, take control of the camera's shutter speed and set it high enough that you get a good sharp image without motion blur.

My last suggestion would be some reading on composition.

Hope that helps
 
Manual is difficult because you are juggling 3 variables; aperture, shutter speed, film speed.

Manual is only difficult when you don't understand exposure. Once you do, manual may be slower, but it is no more difficult. Exposure becomes a different kind of problem once you understand these relationships.
 
Another country heard from - I only use two modes Manual and Auto.
I shoot in manual quite a bit so don't see any problems with settings. Approaching a shot I'm considering ISO and will go with 400 or less unless it's a dark area. DOF shallow or deep sets aperture so just speed is usually changed based on the meter. I have a one wheel camera so the wheel does speed unless my right index finger moves from the shutter release about 1/4" and holds down that button so the wheel now changes aperture. Index finger on left hand moves a 1/2" and now ISO is changed. Only a second or two and ready for the shot. Sometimes I just go with AUTO Mode and with these new cameras that works very well.
 
Another country heard from - I only use two modes Manual and Auto.
I shoot in manual quite a bit so don't see any problems with settings. Approaching a shot I'm considering ISO and will go with 400 or less unless it's a dark area. DOF shallow or deep sets aperture so just speed is usually changed based on the meter. I have a one wheel camera so the wheel does speed unless my right index finger moves from the shutter release about 1/4" and holds down that button so the wheel now changes aperture. Index finger on left hand moves a 1/2" and now ISO is changed. Only a second or two and ready for the shot. Sometimes I just go with AUTO Mode and with these new cameras that works very well.

Hey there fellas, welcome to the UN!

Lol

One thing to note, a lot of cameras if you set them on full auto mode the camera will assume your taking a portrait shot, so they tend to prioritize keeping the ISO low by keeping the shutter speed down. When shooting wildlife if you must the "sports" mode will usually work better, but to be honest even it will give too high a priority to ISO and not nearly enough priority to shutter speed in most cases. So I recommend shutter priority mode, set your shutter speed fairly high (1/400 is usually a good starting point) and you'll be able to keep up with most wildlife fairly well, if your looking at a flying bird then you'll want to go even higher to avoid motion blur on the wings. The smaller the bird, the faster the wings, the higher shutter speed you need for a clear shot.
 
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