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Thinking of Quitting my "Real" Job

DGMPhotography

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I could use some advice from the wise experienced sages here...

I'm not satisfied at all at my current job. The boss and I don't get along/communicate very well and I don't enjoy the work I'm doing.

I was originally told it would be focused on creative work, but that has been on the backburner to make way for more administrative type things.

And so I'm thinking of quitting. But I'm afraid of disappointing my boss and the company, and potentially creating a stain on my resume. But when I go to work each morning anxious and unhappy... I don't know if I can keep doing it.

I do currently have an offer on the table for a part time job with the state. Pay is about double what I make here, and I can work from home/make my own schedule. It would be only up to 29 hours a week, but with the pay difference it would balance out.

So what do you think? Do you think I should do it? Why? Why not? How would you go about doing it?

Thanks!
 
Part time, are you sure of 29 hours every week so the pay will be comparable? or could the hours drop? No benefits? Opportunity to get on full time? Sometimes I think govt. jobs that are contracted are for a limited time, at least in my state, they'd be posted for a 2 year project or whatever.

I worked for a county agency for 20+ years working with kids and families. And still, lots of red tape and a busy 'department of redundancy department' as we jokingly called it. Was decent pay and benefits and retirement, and getting on with a county agency did have its advantages, job security, etc. We always said we'd never be out of jobs, there are always kids and families needing the services (and that we'd be just as glad if there weren't).

But anyway, make sure the job would be better than what you'd be leaving and you're not getting into something that will be as lousy as this job. Is this a type of work you want to do long term? Maybe you should keep looking and when you do leave, give your current employer adequate notice - even if you don't plan to ask for references you probably want to leave on good terms.
 
vintagesnaps has great points.
Others to consider are.

Is if this offer isn't a permanent position, having a bunch of short time jobs on a resume doesn't always go over well with future employers.

Working from home can be a great thing. I do with my current position quite often but it does take some self discipline to not waste company time making that quick run to the store on company time.

Now I have been in a similar position as yours and I sat down with my employer and told them exactly where I stood.
I'm not feeling that I'm being employed to my potential and have an opportunity for employment in my field of expertise (add your own reason here) and although I did enjoy working where I was the new employment was better suited to my skills.
I offered to remain on for a month to ease the training of a new person. My employer at the time understood and was quite happy that day to day operations would not slow down due to my training the next person.
We parted on amicable terms and I have been offered a position if I ever decide to return.
 
I do currently have an offer on the table for a part time job with the state. Pay is about double what I make here, and I can work from home/make my own schedule. It would be only up to 29 hours a week, but with the pay difference it would balance out.
If you have line on a job that pays double, yet only requires 3/4 the workload, then you're making out. leaving you more free time.

I'll never quit a job without another lined up first. Couldn't give a crap what the boss or company would think of it -- granted they'd be lost without me -- but that's their problem.
 
You sometimes gotta take acceptable risks. Life is short, and while I accept its nonsensical to leave a job and have no prospects and we need to work, to live eat etc, the consequences of being miserable far outweigh the consequences of having slightly less money in a happier job.
 
I would proceed with caution. well thought out...well planned....caution.

if the position is not a temporary one, it might very well be worth it.
since the state job is only 29 hours and from home with you making your own schedule, is it possible for you to do both jobs until you make sure the new one is really the better deal?
 
I could use some advice from the wise experienced sages here...

I'm not satisfied at all at my current job. The boss and I don't get along/communicate very well and I don't enjoy the work I'm doing.

I was originally told it would be focused on creative work, but that has been on the backburner to make way for more administrative type things.

And so I'm thinking of quitting. But I'm afraid of disappointing my boss and the company, and potentially creating a stain on my resume. But when I go to work each morning anxious and unhappy... I don't know if I can keep doing it.

I do currently have an offer on the table for a part time job with the state. Pay is about double what I make here, and I can work from home/make my own schedule. It would be only up to 29 hours a week, but with the pay difference it would balance out.

So what do you think? Do you think I should do it? Why? Why not? How would you go about doing it?

Thanks!
I'll admit to being experienced, but hardly wise. I've quit jobs that made me continually angry, so I support that.

Several job changes will not affect your resume as much as being fired from one or more of them.

Once you get on with the state you can apply for other jobs that are not available to non-employees.

Make the jump.
 
You need to look at your health care costs for you/your family based on current gig vs. new position. If that works then go for it with the new job. Life is too short to spend 1/3 of your day miserable.
 
"But I'm afraid of disappointing my boss and the company"

Just so you know. If a company is losing money and they look at their employee list, they just start cutting on what they consider non-essential jobs, irregardless of disappointing their employees.

Does your current job offer any benefits?
Medical, dental, 401k? What are those benefits worth to you, and what do they cost if you try to obtain them by yourself?
Add that to you current Salary BEFORE and AFTER taxes

then compare it to the 29 hours job, which probably is 29 hours so that it doesn't have to provide benefits. Then start adding the cost of those benefits that you would have to supplant.
Oh, and don't forget if this is contract /1099 to subtract the taxes you'll have to pay for income, etc.

you might be behind in that pay raise.
We'd have to know more about all the benefits you currently get, and the job you may move to.

But .. then write down the benefits and risks you'll get with moving to another job.
and once you understand the true value of income then you can make a better decision.
 
Never feel bad about leaving a job or hurting an employer's "feelings". You have to whats best for you because you can sure bet that a company would fire your ass in a second if it was better for them.
 
I just retired from a job after 33 1/2 years at the same place. Jobs like life are what you make of them. They have their ups they have their downs, but it's what you make of it that counts.

Never leave a job without having something else to take place to put money in your pocket and food on your table. Also make sure you're well aware of what this potential new job truly is. Nothing worse than jumping from the frying pan into the fire.
 
Thanks for the advice, yall.

To clarify...

I do have the option of benefits where I am now, but I don't take them since I'm 22 and still have 4 years left on my dad's insurance. I don't have a family to worry about - just myself.

My plan is to give my two weeks, and then offer to do free photography for their events (which I was going to do as an employee anyway) as an act of good faith.

I actually have been working the state job for about two weeks now and I like it. I really like my boss and I can tell that we're going to get along well. I like the work too. As for long term... I emailed her about that today. It would be nice if it's at least a year-long employment.
 
You gave a two week notice and offered to shoot events for free? Why on earth would you do that. At that point you should be charging for your work. You have given them adequate notice that you are leaving, if they see the value you in your photography skills, they should have to pay for it at that point because you are no longer an employee of the company. You need money for your time and wear and tear on your equipment. (Just my 2 cents)
 
You gave a two week notice and offered to shoot events for free? Why on earth would you do that. At that point you should be charging for your work. You have given them adequate notice that you are leaving, if they see the value you in your photography skills, they should have to pay for it at that point because you are no longer an employee of the company. You need money for your time and wear and tear on your equipment. (Just my 2 cents)

Well it's because they originally hired me under the assumption that I would stay for a year. Nothing was signed, though. But because that was their expectation, and I don't want to leave them out to dry, I thought it'd be a nice gesture. Also want a good reference in the future.
 
22 and no big financial obligations like student loans or mortgage? Definitely a good move to find something you like better now before other responsibilities prevent you from doing what YOU want to do.
 

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