Upgrading from Canon XDi (400D) to 80D or T6s (760D)?

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by aitax85, Jan 27, 2017.

  1. aitax85

    aitax85 TPF Noob!

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    Hi guys, I have my Canon XDi that has started to have autofocusing issues, plus it's hold and can't get go higher then iso 800 that the picture has so much noise.
    So i finally decided to upgrade.
    I would need an all around camera, had a look at those two i put in the description. I would like to stick with canon because i have some lenses which i like and don't want to get rid of.
    I know that overall the 80d is a better camera, but i was wondering if it is really worth to spend the extra money on it.
    I don't shoot a lot of sports, so i won't need a superfast camera. And i don't really mind the video.

    hope some of you guys can give some suggestions.

    Thanks


     
  2. zombiesniper

    zombiesniper Furtographer Extraordinaire! Supporting Member

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    They are pretty close to being the same camera. With the 80d you will get a little better ISO performance, little faster shutter, a much improved auto focus with about 3 times the focus points BUT the T6s will take the same picture in most situations. You can still do the occasional fast action or sports.
    I would go to a shop and check them both out. Then look at the added features of the 80D, while doing this think of weather you will really use the added features. If not T6s, if on the other hand you find the extra features to be quite beneficial to you, 80D.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2017
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  3. nerwin

    nerwin Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I don't know much about Canon cameras but I'll try to help.

    Both cameras you listed will have MUCH better high ISO performance.

    The lenses you own, are they full frame? If so, I'd recommend going with the 6D since you are already thinking about getting the 80D, you can find the 6D refurbished or used at the same price or cheaper than the 80D. The 6D has a full frame sensor which will have superior low light high ISO performance. If you are shooting in low light a lot, it's worth it.

    Otherwise I'd pass over the T6S and just get the 80D.

    You could also just get the the T6i and save yourself a little bit of money to get another lens or something.
     
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  4. aitax85

    aitax85 TPF Noob!

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    Thank you for answering.
    The lenses I have are all APS-C. So i would exclude the 6D even though I saw great deals.
    I will probably check them out in a shop. I checked online all the specs over and over. Hope that by seeing them in person i'll make up my mind
     
  5. goodguy

    goodguy Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    It seems like you keep a camera for a long time, so on this ground I would say get the 80D, you already know its the better camera so why cheap out ?
    Its better in many ways and at the long run you will be happier with it.
     
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  6. aitax85

    aitax85 TPF Noob!

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    You are probably right. I thought of that. I would keep it at least 4-5 years.

    Thanks again
     
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  7. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    Personal Opinion: I've long felt that the more you rely on consumer-type lenses (f/4~5.6 or f/4.5~5.6 zooms), that the better AF system is almost always the better-performing camera, and that is these days, the main differentiator of entry-level and mid-level and high-level cameras: the entry-level cameras have lower-spec'd AF modules, and typically less bandwidth that drives them. This has been true since the first-generation of the d-slr market.

    Using something like a 70-300mm f/4~5.6 zoom lens in marginal lighting levels, or for shooting fast and furious, my money will ALWAYS be on the better camera body, with the better AF module/system, the more cross-type focusing squares, and the more-powerful CPU to run the entire camera. I've shot the SAME doggy lens, Nikon 55-200 on a D40 and a D2x...on the D40 the lens was laggy and not very responsive, but on the D2x with 11 AF squares, 9 of the cross-type, and a sophisticated Group Dynamic mode AF system, the lens was respectable.

    Once you move up to the "pro-type" lenses focused by expensive ultrasonic motors, lenses like the 135/2 or 85/1.8 or 70-200/2.8, then it beomes the LENSES that tend to bring the party: fast apertures for very decidedly IN-focus or OUT-of-of focus data as the lens is pointed and focused; powerful, in-lens AF motors; oftentimes internal focusing of very small, light-weight element groups. A 70-200/2.8 even on a low-end Canon will focus fast. But the consumer and entry-level lenses do better on the mid- and high-end cameras.
     
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