Archival Photography Question

Discussion in 'Medium Format & Large Format' started by MoonLoon, Oct 4, 2017.

  1. cgw

    cgw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Apocryphal, I'm afraid. Just how do they propose to make the archived film images available? Or are they comfortable with the public pawing the original photos? CDRs aren't the only storage media. Nor is film.


     
  2. MoonLoon

    MoonLoon TPF Noob!

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    My experience is more in cinema, dealing with preservation of nitrate prints, etc. I can't tell you how many horror stories I've heard like this, that involve other types of storage mediums. BTW I would absolutely photograph each original twice. I understand this idea is a little unorthodox but if there's a way to do this right I'd love to know. I already have a general idea, my questions are now what is the best B&W stock to use, what kind of lens attachment would I need to get each photo to fill the frame (I know I'm working with a very different aspect ratio but I would think the resolution of 120 provides sufficient head room).
     
  3. compur

    compur No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Using a TLR for copy work is probably the most problematic way to go however Rollei did make close-up lenses for their Rolleiflex TLRs called Rolleinars which you would likely need if you want to go that route. It would be a pain to do it this way though.

    I suggest using an SLR and a macro lens or at least an extension tube or bellows with a normal lens.

    In general you'd want a fine grain conventional B&W film with excellent sharpness. The specific type would depend on a few things like -
    - do you plan to process it yourself or have a lab do it?
    - if a lab then do you have a lab that you know does good work in B&W?
    - what is your budget?
    - where are you located?
    - how many prints are you copying?
     
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  4. Jamesaz

    Jamesaz TPF Noob!

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    I did some copy work recently and used FP-4. Developed in Tmax 1:4. It was 35mm but it came out fine. I used the same setup to make b/w negs from slides. Good luck
     
  5. Dave442

    Dave442 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I used Plus-X Pan back when I shot film. I also tried some Ilford FP4 as I had started going to some of their chemicals and papers from Kodak. I think the Ilford is still available, Plus-X is not.

    While film has already proven itself to last for over a hundred years, I have also come across a lot of film that is now useless due to poor storage.

    I would probably go with a Pentax 645 with the Ilford FP4.
     
  6. compur

    compur No longer a newbie, moving up!

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  7. MoonLoon

    MoonLoon TPF Noob!

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    Sounds good, will definitely look into a Pentax 645 with a 220 back to make things easier.

    I was originally thinking of having the film processed at Photoworks in San Francisco, would love to hear if anyone's had success with their work. However, the photo album belongs to my aunt who lives in South America, so raw film would be going through x rays on the way over and back. I am unsure of whether to put the film through this. This is a long shot but if anyone knows of a good place to purchase and process B&W film in Bogota, Colombia fee free to let me know.
     
  8. Dave442

    Dave442 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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  9. webestang64

    webestang64 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The set up they are using is a copy stand with 2 lights at a 45 degree angle, polarized, a Mamiya 645 with a 80mm f4 macro (flat field) with polarizing filter to dial out any reflections or "silvered" prints.
    Lens set at f8, shutter speed set by metering off a gray card. T-Max 100 rated at 100 and processed in T-Max developer at 15% less time. Take 2 shots for every piece.
    Need color use Ektar 100, rated at 125 and process normally. They will have all the film processed here at my lab as I do all the BW by hand and our C-41 processor is control strip monitored for consistent results every time.
     
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  10. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    MoonLoon: despite the naysayers in this thread, what you are attempting is easily done, and the process webestang64 just described using the copystand is correct. You will end up with two archival negatives of each of your family photos, just as you want. Make sure they are properly stored and you've bought the family another 100 years, easily.

    If the process sounds complicated or lengthy, imagine trying to write down how to tie one's shoes. ;)
     
  11. Jamesaz

    Jamesaz TPF Noob!

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    For a copy stand, I use an old enlarger chassis. Just the base and mast, I drilled a hole thru the part that raises and lowers, used a bolt (3/8), some washers and a tripod head for leveling. It's effective if not pretty. You'll have to be cautious of parallax with a TLR but with proper testing should be ok. An slr would make it much easier though.
     
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  12. OldManJim

    OldManJim TPF Noob!

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    The process Webstang 64 is exactly the same as the one I used about 10 years ago to make copies of old prints for a customer. This process should be preserved as a "sticky" sine I think the question will come up more often as digital storage media fail.
     

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