Background light

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by plastii, Mar 31, 2010.

  1. plastii

    plastii TPF Noob!

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    Last edited: Apr 1, 2010
  2. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    Position a flash head aimed straight at the background, with the flash's reflector about the mid-back height of the subject, or perhaps very slightly lower. Using a smaller reflector like a 5.5 to 7 inch reflector, with the flash head reasonably close to the background material, you will naturally create a graduated fall-off in the light on the background. Depending on the flash system you may, or may not, need to add a honeycomb grid to the flash head; it kind of depends on the flash.
     
  3. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep TPF Noob!

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    Also the same effect can be done with Photoshop with a fully lit background.

    Deppends on if you want to do it the traditional way or the digital way. ;)
     
  4. Sw1tchFX

    Sw1tchFX TPF Noob!

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    yeah, but the real way always looks better.
     
  5. plastii

    plastii TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the info - do I have to use flash? Can I use spot light or flood light?
     
  6. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    No, it doesn't have to be flash...but if you are using flash/strobe as your main light, then it might be more of a challenge to match the exposure and WB of the main/fill lights to the background light.

    If you are using the same type of continuous lights for all your lighting, then it would be easier to balance...but IMO, that is not the best way go about shooting portraits....flash/strobe is much better.
     

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