dev tanks

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by ferny, Jan 9, 2005.

  1. ferny

    ferny TPF Noob!

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    I'm thinking of getting one so I can develop my own b&w film, check which negs I like then ask for those ones to be printed. I'd be able to use bulk film then to.
    I know nothing about them (this is my first post in this forum I think), so is there anything special I should consider before buying or they much of a muchness? I'd like the develop 135 and 120 film. Should I get a tank which does both or two tanks?

    I think I read a while ago that Patterson are good. Oh, and what's your view on a second hand one?
     
  2. oriecat

    oriecat work in progress

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    Welcome to the darkroom, ferny! :)

    If you use plastic, then the reels can be changed from 135 to 120 size. You would need a tank that holds two reels (when 135 size). If you go with stainless, then you would need two different reels. I am not sure if you can use the same tank, probably, but not sure since I don't use it.

    I see nothing wrong with a second hand tank, as long as you clean it really good when you first get it, and you make sure it has all the parts.
     
  3. aggiezach

    aggiezach Yup...

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    With Stainless Steel you can use the same tank to do both 35mm and 120. I"ve used both and they both have their advantages and disadvantages.

    Stainless Steel:
    Easy to clean
    Easy to regulate Temperatures
    They look good :)

    The reels are typically harder to load (until you get used to them) but you can get reels for 135 that load really easily (They're made by Hewes and they have a little tab for the sprocket holes and no clips) I highly recomend these if you go with SS.

    Plastic:
    You would only need two reels becasue they can adjust to 135 or MF film.
    The reels are very easy to load

    Harder to clean
    Harder to regulate Temps when you need to keep em constant.
    Plastic can break if its dropped.

    Hope this helped a bit. I went from plastic to stainless steel and not that I'm used to the SS I love them and would not go back to the plastic reels and tanks. Like I said I got the Hewes reels and I think they are almost easier to load than the plastic ones...

    Zach :D
     
  4. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    Check out Paterson - they do a range of tanks and their spirals adjust for 35mm, 126 and 120. They will take 220 film as well.
    The downside to stainless steel tanks (apart from fiddly loading) is that if you drop a spiral 9 times out of 10 you will dent it and then it's junk. Plastic spirals bounce.
    The majority of schools and colleges in the UK use Paterson.
     
  5. ferny

    ferny TPF Noob!

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    You mean the darkside? ;)
    I'm not there yet. Give me about ten years.


    Thanks guys. :)

    I heard steel ones can be harder to load. I don't understand the temperature and cleaning side of it. I'd have thought metal tanks would be harder to regulate as they are a better heat conductor. How comes they're easier to clean? Do you mean you can scrub them and not worry about scratching them?


    You can probably tell I haven't looked into this a great deal. Apart from this thread the only research I've done is reading a couple of sites six months ago. :oops:
     
  6. ferny

    ferny TPF Noob!

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    I've been reading an article.
    http://photography.about.com/library/weekly/aa051401a.htm
    It says that most reels take up to 36 shots. Is that true? The reason I ask is because I'd like to use bulk film. I'm talking about making up my own rolls of film, 40+ shots a go. Do I need a special (bigger?) tank for that?
     
  7. aggiezach

    aggiezach Yup...

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    Well there is one problem I can forsee...

    In my limited experience bulk rolling film.. I'm not sure if you could physically get a roll to hold enough film to get 40+ shots. There is not a lot of space in those containers and I think 36-40 is the max number of frames you could squeeze onto a roll! Just a thought...


    Zach :D
     
  8. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Yes, most 35mm dev reels can only handle approx 36 frames. In fact, I usually bulk load approx 32 frames rolls ( I want the roll to fit into 1 Printfile which is 35 frames ) , and I've had rolls that left a few inches hanging when put on the dev reels. The problem there is that even a minimal amount of agitation will scratch the hanging film. Since I ran into this a few times I keep my bulk loaded rolls at 28-30 frames.

    Other things to consider: the cassettes can only handle a little more than a 36 frame strip of film before it begins compressing the film, possibly leading to scratches. The motors for winding the film in many modern cameras can't handle the drag of longer rolls of film. If you read the small print in the manuals of many consumer oriented cameras, the manufacturers recommend using 24 exp rolls over 36 exp rolls due to incresed wear on the winding motor .
     
  9. ferny

    ferny TPF Noob!

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    I didn't think of the cartridge size. :oops:
    But I've never opened one up to see how much space it had (that's my excuse and I'm sticking to it! :p).
    The reason why I thought you could load more is because I remember reading in my Dynax manual when I got it (and before I knew anything about photography) that the counter goes up to 70. I wonder why it goes so high. It can only take 135 film.


    Thanks for the help guys. I just won three books on eBay as well. Enlarging techniques by A.Spoerl, 200 Darkroom tips by Jan van Welzen and The Focal guide to Enlarging. Perhaps getting a bit ahead of myself. But they only cost £2.74 in total and it won't hurt to read them. :)
     
  10. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Possibly it can be fitted with a different back that holds longer rolls of film?

    If you try to load your own rolls of more than 40, I think you'll quickly notice that it gets tight pretty quick. It actually becomes hard to turn the bulk loader handle.
     
  11. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Nice to see you in here, Ferny! Good luck with it, it's such a joy to do. I think books are never a bad idea, btw - I have several. Some are more helpful than others at the nitty-gritty details, but I enjoy them all.

    I use Paterson tanks and plastc reels, btw, and have yet to encounter any real difficulty. (No bulk loading for me, though. :wink: )
     
  12. ferny

    ferny TPF Noob!

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    I just won a Paterson system 4 with three adjustable reels on eBay for (including p&p) £10.50 ($19.72).
    Seems a good deal to me. No going back now.

    *gulp*
     

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