Ilford SFX Film Question

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by benjyman345, Apr 17, 2007.

  1. benjyman345

    benjyman345 TPF Noob!

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    hi,

    I have a roll of Inford SFX 200. I know it is a B&W film with extended sensitivity into the near infrared at 740nm.

    I have never used this film before and was wondering what is the best use for this film? Should I use any filters? I think they suggest red - what strength? Does the in-built camera metre work sufficently for this film or do I need to take into account any exposure errors?
    Also I believe you develop this film in the normal processes in the darkroom? If there is any other information I should know about it please let me know.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    Because the film's sensitivity does not extend all that far into the IR portion of the spectrum, you'll need a darker filter if you want it to produce truly IR-looking shots. If you look at the actual SFX filters made my Ilford, they're very dark, probably akin to a 29 or so. You can shoot it with a lighter filter, like a 25, but you aren't going to see that big of a difference between it and regular b&w film.

    Check out the fact sheet here:
    http://www.ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/2007321132823302.pdf
     
  3. Steph

    Steph No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Also, be aware that some cameras use an IR sensor to count frames when advancing the film. This will fog the IR film.
     
  4. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    Yeah but SFX rolls off around 740nm. There's no way an IR sensor is going to output light at that short a wavelength. I would worry about that, on the other hand, with something like HIE or 820c, but not SFX.
     
  5. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I've shot the stuff with my Pentax MZ-S, and the infrared film advance sensor had zero effect with that film.

    I got nice IR effects with a #25, but I would agree if you wanted them more pronounced, a darker red filter will give you that. If all you have is a #25, though, give it a try too.
     
  6. gizmo2071

    gizmo2071 TPF Noob!

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    I'm glad somebody posted about this film.
    I'm about to buy some B&W film and thought I might pick some of this up.
    I think it might pick up a few rolls now to go with the fp4/hp5 I get :D
     
  7. Steph

    Steph No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I stand corrected and I am glad to learn that I can use SFX in my Canon EOS 50E.
     
  8. benjyman345

    benjyman345 TPF Noob!

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    I have been unable to find any red filters abover 25a unless I buy an Infrared filter, which blocks all visible light.

    Just a thought.... if I placed two 25a Red filters on top of each other would this work? If so what would it be equivalent too?

    Thanks
     
  9. Helen B

    Helen B TPF Noob!

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    The Wratten 25 (it used to be called the 'A') has a 50% absorption wavelength of 600 nm. At longer wavelengths there is very little absorption, so stacking two of them together won't move the 50% wavelength very much.

    The Wratten 29 has a 50% absorption at 620 nm. The B+W 091 is a 630 nm filter. Both these can be seen through.

    Most people can just see through the B+W 092 (50% @ 695 nm) but very dimly.

    Best,
    Helen
     
  10. benjyman345

    benjyman345 TPF Noob!

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    So what filter should I look out for this film?

    I know 25A will be fine but I want something which will enhance the IR a bit more and create a mroe dramatic effect.

    When I search B&W 091 filter I can only find the Cokin P091 Dream Diffuser Filter.

    thanks
     
  11. Helen B

    Helen B TPF Noob!

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    It's B+W rather than B&W. The Wratten 29 is very close to the 091.

    Best,
    Helen
     
  12. benjyman345

    benjyman345 TPF Noob!

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    I have found an R72. (I believe thats a dedicated IR filter)

    Is that overkill?
     

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