need serious help..

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by zandman, Aug 8, 2008.

  1. zandman

    zandman TPF Noob!

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    i'm gonna do a photoshoot tommorow for my friend's promotion something.
    i haven't done anything like this before, the set-up will be outdoor photos, my idea is to use all available light or flash on some.

    i need more ideas and suggestions you can give me to make this photoshoot some kind of "proffesional" looking. there's no money involve so not too much pressure but i want to do it right and nice. another thing is he mentioned that his friend might come and she is a model so in case she come, i don't want to dissapoint 'em.

    i have 15hrs and 28min left before the session.

    thanks for future help, :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2008
  2. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    There's not a lot of advice to offer on such a broad request. If you can, get out to the area ahead of time, and scout it; see what the lighting is like, where the shadows will fall, where people are likely to congregate and where you can be to get the optimum view and cause minimal interference. Also spend some time practicing, especially with the use of fill-flash. Bring lots of memory and batteries. Good luck.
     
  3. zandman

    zandman TPF Noob!

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    thanks, i can't sleep still thinking what to do,
    some of the places to shoot will be under the bridge, subway, basically urban setting with graffiti walls.
     
  4. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Take your time, check your settings, review each shot after you've taken it, and if it's not quite right, take another. In fact, assuming your flash will cycle quickly enough, take several exposures each time, just to account for someone blinking, or looking away at the critical moment.
     
  5. zandman

    zandman TPF Noob!

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    it'll be sunny so i think my flash can cope up with burst.
    thanks for the tips.

    would it be a good idea to use or not use the diffuser on the flash?
     
  6. Bifurcator

    Bifurcator TPF Noob!

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    There's allot of good tips here at TPF. I would use the diffuser over not. There's one girl here that shoots weddings and she points the flash over her head backwards away from the subject. :D
     
  7. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    backwards flash I can understand inside - with a wall to relfect the light back onto the subject, but outside - check you have a wall to tyour back I would think.
    Also as you are outside check your cameras histogram since this will help you prevent overexposed and underexposed elements in your photos - idealy the histogram wants to be in teh middle - all to the left and you have underexposed (black) areas - all to the right and you have overexposed (blowout) areas - in the sunlight I often find undexposing the meter on the camera when composing a shot helps to prevent the light from causing blowouts
     

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