Rapid fixer not so rapid

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by Don Simon, Feb 3, 2007.

  1. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

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    So I just developed a film using the same developer, rapid fixer and detergent I use for most b&w films (no stop bath). Developer and fixer by Fotospeed - sure I'm probably just being difficult by not using Ilford or Kodak but I've always been very happy with the results from the Fotospeed... until now.

    Anyway the developer and fixer are both liquid concentrates, which I diluted 1+9 as usual. Both were reasonably fresh having just been opened, before which they were stored in a fairly cold room. I went through exactly the same process I always go through when using these chemicals; same agitation, same rinsing, etc. Now the company recommends 2 minutes at 1+9, but I always allow 3-4 and never noticed any negative side effects. This time it was 4, and yet when I took the film out after washing it clearly wasn't fixed properly. Back went the film into the tank, re-fixed for another 4 minutes, after which it was clearly much better although still not as clear as I'd like.

    So basically what I'm wondering is, could the fixer have simply been poorly sealed or from a bad batch? Obviously I'll be able to answer that myself once I've shot another couple of rolls but in the meantime I'm wondering if anyone else has had similar experiences where chemicals have 'misbehaved' even when they're fresh and you haven't deviated from your normal way of processing? Thanks.
     
  2. Philip Weir

    Philip Weir TPF Noob!

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    I can't comment on the particular brand of chemistry you use, I've never heard of it, but as you suggest it could have been a bad batch but I doubt it. I would suggest though that you use a stop bath, it will instantly stop the developer acting on the film and will stop the fixer neutralising.
     
  3. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

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    Thanks Philip, also I think it was Terri and Matt? Answers from before today got deleted so I might have missed some, but using stop bath seems to be the consensus. Will try that with the same fixer and see how it goes. Thanks again!
     
  4. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    My answer was actually about saving the world. Slightly off topic, granted. Anyway, now it's lost and will never happen. :meh:
     
  5. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    I said alkaline developer kills acid fixer. Use an acid stop bath to kill the developer before the film/paper goes into the fixer.
     

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